My Forbidden Face: Growing Up Under the Taliban - A Young Woman'sStory

My Forbidden Face Growing Up Under the Taliban A Young Woman sStory An astonishing first hand account of a young womans life lived under the tyranny of the Taliban Born into a middle class Afghan family in Kabul in Latifa spent her teenage days talking fashion a

  • Title: My Forbidden Face: Growing Up Under the Taliban - A Young Woman'sStory
  • Author: Chékéba Hachemi
  • ISBN: 9780786869015
  • Page: 142
  • Format: Hardcover
  • An astonishing first hand account of a young womans life lived under the tyranny of the Taliban.Born into a middle class Afghan family in Kabul in 1980, Latifa spent her teenage days talking fashion and movies with her friends, listening to music, and dreaming of one day becoming a journalist Then, on September 26, 1996, Taliban soldiers seized power in Kabul Suddenly, sAn astonishing first hand account of a young womans life lived under the tyranny of the Taliban.Born into a middle class Afghan family in Kabul in 1980, Latifa spent her teenage days talking fashion and movies with her friends, listening to music, and dreaming of one day becoming a journalist Then, on September 26, 1996, Taliban soldiers seized power in Kabul Suddenly, streets were deserted Her school was closed Phones were cut The radio fell silent And from that moment, Latifa, just sixteen years old, became a prisoner in her own home The simplest and most basic freedomslike walking down the street alone or even looking out of a windowwere forbidden Latifa had never worn a veil before, but was now forced to be swathed in a chadri, the state mandated uniform that covered her entire body Her disbelief at having to hide her face was soon replaced by fear, the fear of being whipped or stoned like the other women shed seen in the streets.Latifa struggled against an overwhelming sense of helplessness and despair In a step of defiance, she set up a clandestine school in her home for a small number of young girls To avoid arousing suspicion, the children were not allowed to attend every day, nor could they keep regular hours Latifa knew that she was risking her life for something that could change little But the teaching gave her a reason to get up in the morning, it helped restore meaning in her life Latifa eventually escaped to Europe with her parents.My Forbidden Face provides a poignant and highly personal account of life under the Taliban regime With painful honesty and clarity, Latifa describes her ordered world falling apart, in the name of fanaticism that she could not comprehend, and replaced by a world where terror and oppression reign Latifa and her parents escaped Afghanistan in May 2001 and were brought to Europe in an operation organized by a French based Afghan resistance group and Elle Magazine Since then she has been writing My Forbidden Face in collaboration with Chekeba Hachemi, the founder of Afghanistan Libre They both live in Paris This is her first book.

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    About "Chékéba Hachemi"

    1. Chékéba Hachemi

      Chékéba Hachemi Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the My Forbidden Face: Growing Up Under the Taliban - A Young Woman'sStory book, this is one of the most wanted Chékéba Hachemi author readers around the world.

    445 thoughts on “My Forbidden Face: Growing Up Under the Taliban - A Young Woman'sStory”

    1. I loved this book. I find it disgusting that people want more from this girl. I’m sorry but did you miss the people being raped and killed? Have people become so selfish that they can only see but their own suffering. Anyone that says this book is a bore is a pathetic excuse for a human being. Latifa didn’t write this book for you to come on here and say it’s boring or it needs something more. She wrote what she wanted people to hear about her life. She wasn’t thinking to herself,” How [...]


    2. چهره ممنوعه من» را چندین سال پیش خواندم. حالا بعد از دیدن فیلم مزارشریف و آن صحنه‌های دلخراش، یاد این کتاب افتادم. کتابی به غایت سنگین برای خواندن. سنگین به معنای وزنی که بر روح و روان آدمی وارد می‌.این کتاب، روایت زندگی در دوره طالبان را از زبان دختری افغان -گویا خبرنگار- بیان [...]


    3. A fascinating and horrifying expose of life in Afghanistan under the Taliban (1996-2001), and the life of Latifa's family during and before this.We also read, as some of her family fought against the Soviet Occupation (1979-1989) of that horrifying period in the history of Afghanistan.In a sense then Afghanistan has had a similar history to Poland before her. A proud nation subjected first to genocidal Nazi occupation and the to Soviet backed Communist tyranny. Afghanistan went first through Com [...]


    4. Started reading this when my daughter had to buy it for a high school class. Actually, she told me that she was reading a book by Queen Latifa in her Geography class. After some time, we sorted out that this was NOT written by Queen Latifa, who, despite being the size of a planet, is not a proper subject of study for AP Geography.Anyhoo, picked it up and had a hard time putting it down. It's not a great booke structure falls apart several times and even at 200 pages it can drag a bitbut it is a [...]


    5. Why do I get to live a privileged life and these women are beaten, tortured, banned from receiving medical/healthcare and not allowed to leave their homes without a male family member? This is the story of a young woman growing up in Afghanistan when the Taliban took over in the mid nineties. According to the author (who wrote this book under a false name) Pakistan supported the Taliban and yet the rest of the world (including the U.S.) was supporting Pakistan. I didn't realize the influence Pak [...]


    6. This is not a good example of the whole women/fundamentalist Islam genre which had its heyday in the early years of the new millennium. There are far more stirring tales of such woes on the market. While the plight of Latifa is not to be sneered at, the book is not one of the best mediums to convey the real difficulties of women under the Taliban. Readers should try other books for a deeper understanding and to gain more empathy.


    7. the content is so interesting. so little i know as an american. her writing is simple not particularly great, but very readable. she is a journalist at heart, and her book is writtne much in this way.



    8. One of the most powerful memoir by a woman I have ever read!This is a great book,it's a story of Latifa,her life in Afghanistan in 'good ol days' before Taliban took over their lives in 1996,during Taliban rule and a little after the US liberated them!How sinister this radical transformation can get for a woman can be seen in cases like Malala too,well this book describes it too well!I got this book for very cheap from a used book shop in India(roadside!) and I was totally captivated by this sto [...]


    9. In this story Latifa, a sixteen year old girl born and raised in Afghanistan, has her rights stripped from her under Taliban tyranny. Latifa has to go from being free and allowed an education and able to follow her dreams as a journalist, to basically becoming a canary in a cage. The Taliban decree laws that are sexist and demoralizing to women. Latifa brings us through the years of suffering endured by her family and other Afghans. This Story gave me a very heartfelt understanding to Latifa, in [...]


    10. I rate this book at a 4 star count.After the Taliban showed up to Kabul Latifa's whole life change from being able to go to school, be outside when she wanted to be, to having to be inside her house 24/7. The women/girls had no rights as soon as the Taliban took over their town; they had everything under their control. All the men had to do what the Taliban men said they had to do and the women had to stay home while their husbands, fathers, brother, etc were out being control under what they so [...]


    11. This is the testimony of Latifa, a 16-year-old girl, who lived in Kabul when the Taliban turned it upside down. Writing under a pseudonym, her story enlightens the dark reality of how this oppressive regime shut the voices of women. Female faces were to be unseen, concealed behind a burka, they were banned from leaving their homes without a male relative, and they were also banned them from work, schools, and public life. Latifa had planned on pursuing journalism, bt when the Taliban took over, [...]


    12. "So, since men as well as women are forbidden by law to laugh in the streets and children are forbidden to play "Can you imagine living under law that forbids laughter? And why on earth someone would force that law? We all know (I suppose) that Talibans are utter fanatics but I’m sure Islam doesn’t forbids laughter. I mean every religion should bring joy to its believer so how come this paradox? And that’s not the only one of course.To anyone who is familiar with Taliban regime this book w [...]


    13. My Forbidden Face by Latifa was a great tale I found worthy of 4 out of 5 stars.This story takes place in Latifa’s hometown of Kabul where she grows up. When Latifa is 14 the Taliban takes control of her city and begins forcing their strict rules on to the people who live there. Latifa’s memoir follows her life and her family’s as she grows up under the Taliban’s rein.The main strength of this book is the passion that Latifa carries throughout the story. Through her words you see her exa [...]


    14. This is a book that is very similar to Zoya's Story, another book about a young Afghan girl trying to survive before and during the Taliban as well as the Soviet invasion in 1979.It must be the masochist in me that keeps returning to the most evil, sadistic, cruel anti-woman country on the planet, where you could have your hands chopped off for wearing nail polish and where women were not allowed to work or be seen by a male doctor, meaning women were unable to get any health care at all.Besides [...]


    15. bookcrossing/journal/8I bought this book out of curiosity. All the discussions about burqa's, voiles, women covering their head. I wanted t know more about the country that is, for me, symbolic for the burqa. It was in a report on Afghanistan that I first saw these blue things that women were hiding in.Once again I am happy that I grew up and live in a free country To have to fight for your human (let alone female) rights, have to hide yourself and your ideas I stil cannot imagine what that must [...]


    16. This is a book about a young girl who grew up in Soviet occupied Afghanistan and was 16 years old when the Taliban came. The most profound thing I learned is how the change that women experienced under the Taliban was literally overnight - at least for those who lived in Kabul. One day this girl was going to school and applying for college. Her sister worked for the airlines. The next day all businesses were closed, the radio and television stations were off the air, and women could not leave th [...]


    17. This read is one of three that I have selected for an independent study I am conducting with a student. In my opinion, this book did for Afghani life during the Taliban takeover what Schindler's List did for broadening the understanding of the small details of the Jewish Holocaust. Imagine being a teenage girl, one moment living in freedom having just finished your first exam for entrance into journalism school, the next moment rights are stripped away. Written under pseudonym, this true account [...]


    18. I was fascinating with how Afghanistan changed under the Taliban. At first, simple laws were passed that restricted activities the Taliban considered evil. Slowly, more and more laws were passed, making more and more activities declared evil. Finally, the laws were so stringent that no one, not even the Taliban, wasfollowing them.


    19. This book is astonishing in many ways. Latifa's writing is beautiful, even if it's translated. This book has transformed what I thought I knew about the Afghani cultureI was absolutely shocked while reading it. My heart aches for Latifa and her family while reading about their struggles. I can't imagine living that way for so long. Now I really want to know what has happened to them in the past decade! Latifa is so full of hope and sounds like an amazing woman. Her entire family sounds like they [...]


    20. This book is a young woman's story who changed her name to Latifa. It's the life of a girl who is in an ongoing war against the Taliban. There life is hard but they are trying there best to survive the Taliban. Latifa got to go to Paris and write her story which is the book. Basically it's a really good and interesting ing book to read. It's very exiting and has a lot of detail. I would suggest those who like sad book or books that have war should try it. It's a short book not that long.


    21. We have all heard the horrors of life in Afghanistan under the Taliban, especially for women--a literal hell on earth. This book is a first-person account written in fairly plain style, but it packs a punch. The rule of the Taliban sounds like something made up in a dark fairy tale. This book is a good reminder of why the U.S. can't just lock our borders and bury our heads when such a horrific human rights crisis is happening elsewhere.


    22. This book took me 3 days to read and this is such a thin little book. I did think it was interesting, the life of the people of Afghanistan, but it wasn't like, i want to know more, I cannot stop reading. To be honest this book was a bit of a bore. There are much better accounts like this one. I do think it was okay though. Glad that I was able to read. 7.5 out of 10


    23. A stunning and brutal tale told through the eyes of the innocent girl trapped inside of it. I would recomend this book to anyone and everyone interested in learning about how the Taliban have affected the daily lives of those living under their control.


    24. My forbidden face “We were all in tears while Wahid kissed our parent’s hands and begged us not to cry” (page 107) is a strong statement to me because it makes me think about how I would feel if I got some sort of earth stopping news in the book My Forbidden Face written by Latifa. Latifa is a young girl, about 15, who lives in Afghanistan during the time the Tailban was attacking. She lives with her family; Mom dad, sister Soraya and her brothers Farad and Daoud. While reading the book, M [...]


    25. During the first week of school, we learnt about the Taliban rule in Afghanistan and the effects and disadvantages that the women faced under the harsh and suppressing rulers. The Taliban, upon seizing power, started a system of gender discrimination effectively thrusting the women of Afghanistan into a state of virtual house arrest, as seen in this website stating all the harsh rules that women had to follow. When i first knew of these, i was shocked that i have never knew of their cruelty and [...]


    26. Even though I have called it a YA book, it would take a gutsy young person to grapple with even reading what Latifa experiences. This is a coming of age story that makes most of the ones we read seem very soft and makes authors like John Green seem trivial by comparison (to be fair Latifa has the advantage of a true story which is always going to be more urgent). It is not that the protagonist wouldn;t like the self-indulgence of angst about a boy or of spoiling herself to make up for how hard l [...]


    27. Need several days to finish this book. Some parts are too violent for me. Yet, this book speaks a lot about the life under Taliban through a teenage girl's eye.


    28. This book provides a first-hand account of daily life in Afghanistan under the Taliban. Latifa (a pseudonym made necessary by death threats to the author and her family members) lived with her family in a middle-class area of Kabul. Her country had been at war her entire life. Over the years, Latifa and her family members struggled to be apolitical just so they could survive the frequent regime changes. One of her brothers served in the army under the Soviets, only to become a political prisoner [...]


    29. akhirnya ku menemukan mu :)ketemu juga buku ini, walaupun bekas tapi masih dalam kondisi bagus. thanks to Ms. Vanessa from Palembang yang sudah berbaik hati menjual bukunya kepadaku thank u ====================================================================baru selesai baca buku ini semalam. tidak bisa membayangkan seandainya saya ada disana. menjadi seorang wanita ditengah rezim taliban berkuasa sepertinya adalah sebuah penyiksaan, mimpi buruk, dan pemaksaan untuk bunuh diri.Latifaa was only [...]


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