Selected Stories of Eudora Welty: A Curtain of Green And Other Stories / The Wide Net and Other Stories

Selected Stories of Eudora Welty A Curtain of Green And Other Stories The Wide Net and Other Stories Eudora Welty s subjects are the people who live in southern towns like Jackson Mississippi which has been her home for all of her long life I ve stayed in one place she says and it s become the so

  • Title: Selected Stories of Eudora Welty: A Curtain of Green And Other Stories / The Wide Net and Other Stories
  • Author: Eudora Welty Katherine Anne Porter
  • ISBN: 9780679600022
  • Page: 287
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Eudora Welty s subjects are the people who live in southern towns like Jackson, Mississippi, which has been her home for all of her long life I ve stayed in one place, she says, and it s become the source of the information that stirs my imagination Her distinctive voice and wry observations are rooted in the southern conversational tradition The stories in this voEudora Welty s subjects are the people who live in southern towns like Jackson, Mississippi, which has been her home for all of her long life I ve stayed in one place, she says, and it s become the source of the information that stirs my imagination Her distinctive voice and wry observations are rooted in the southern conversational tradition The stories in this volume, from the first two collections she published, range in tone from the quietly understated and psychologically subtle to the outrageously grotesque.

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      287 Eudora Welty Katherine Anne Porter
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      Published :2019-07-13T22:57:35+00:00

    About "Eudora Welty Katherine Anne Porter"

    1. Eudora Welty Katherine Anne Porter

      Eudora Alice Welty was an award winning American author who wrote short stories and novels about the American South Her book The Optimist s Daughter won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973 and she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, among numerous awards She was the first living author to have her works published by the Library of America.Welty was born in Jackson, Mississippi, and lived a significant portion of her life in the city s Belhaven neighborhood, where her home has been preserved She was educated at the Mississippi State College for Women now called Mississippi University for Women , the University of Wisconsin Madison, and Columbia Business School While at Columbia University, where she was the captain of the women s polo team, Welty was a regular at Romany Marie s caf in 1930.During the 1930s, Welty worked as a photographer for the Works Progress Administration, a job that sent her all over the state of Mississippi photographing people from all economic and social classes Collections of her photographs are One Time, One Place and Photographs.Welty s true love was literature, not photography, and she soon devoted her energy to writing fiction Her first short story, Death of a Traveling Salesman, appeared in 1936 Her work attracted the attention of Katherine Anne Porter, who became a mentor to her and wrote the foreword to Welty s first collection of short stories, A Curtain of Green, in 1941 The book immediately established Welty as one of American literature s leading lights and featured the legendary and oft anthologized stories Why I Live at the P.O Petrified Man, and A Worn Path Her novel, The Optimist s Daughter, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.In 1992, Welty was awarded the Rea Award for the Short Story for her lifetime contributions to the American short story, and was also a charter member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, founded in 1987 In her later life, she lived near Belhaven College in Jackson, Mississippi, where, despite her fame, she was still a common sight among the people of her hometown.Eudora Welty died of pneumonia in Jackson, Mississippi, at the age of 92, and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery in Jackson.Excerpted and adopted from.

    335 thoughts on “Selected Stories of Eudora Welty: A Curtain of Green And Other Stories / The Wide Net and Other Stories”


    1. The Merriam-Webster online dictionary says that the short story often concentrates on "creation of mood rather than plot." That is true of the stories of Eudora Welty.


    2. To be clear, Eudora Welty is undoubtedly a master of the miniature, one of the best short story writers of all time-- but this book, despite whatever connotations its title might carry, is not quite a "best of" anthology; rather, these "selected" stories simply represent the contents of her first two short story collections.Both, I think, are mixed bags. The first collection is called Curtain of Green, and it contains compact little stories that seem to revel in the (often violent and grotesque) [...]



    3. A wonderful collection - Welty's prose is gorgeous, her stories complex and sometimes difficult to follow, her gaze direct and unflinching - scarily so in some stories, which are dark and brooding, others light and yet also full of black humour. Shades of Flannery O'Conner weave through many of the lives depicted and I had to miss a few pages here and there because they were way too confronting and uncomfortable. I love the way she writes, the way she strings her sentences together, the words sh [...]


    4. This seemed to be hit or miss for me. The Key was my favorite piece. Her observations on the human condition were interesting to me, but the stories themselves seldom were; I felt no connection to most of them. As well, my personal opinion is that some of them were a bit over-written, and lacked the condensed power of a great short story.The lady was talented, to be sure, just not always my cup of tea.


    5. Eudora Welty paints a picture of the characters and the room - putting you "right there" in the Old South. I hear her voice when I read her stories - as I was a big fan of her stories told on NPR.


    6. rereading this after many years, what a joy to know what one good writer could do. Judging from the intro, this collection preceded any novels written by Welty.


    7. Her writing has lovely lyrical turns, but she's a product of her white Southern (read: racist) time, and that made it hard to enjoy. More like 2.5 stars."It was dark and vague outside. The storm had rolled away to faintness like a wagon crossing a bridge." p.40"People standing in the fields now and then, or on top of the haystacks, had been too far away, looking like leaning sticks or weeds, turning a little at the solitary rattle of his car across their countryside, watching the pale sobered wi [...]


    8. I had never read anything by Eudora Welty, outside of "Why I Live at the P.O", which I think I read in High School freshman year. So, over the years I have heard and read about her, how great she is and all that.I have to say, she really was a masterful short story writer, up there with whoever you want to put her with - she's got all the chops: deft characterization, dramatic sense, a great handle on story architecture, all the classic stuff.But, what I like about her is the authentic Southern [...]


    9. PETRIFIED MAN - Petrified Man comes from the book, Selected Stories of Eudora Welty. For the purposes of this review, I will only discuss the short story (not the book in its entirety). The author conveys the character’s voices so remarkably well. That is, several women sitting in a beauty parlor, enduring the tortures of beauty treatments. The majority of their conversation is focused on men. For that reason, the battle of the sexes theme is apparent. The title refers back to the Medusa myth [...]


    10. To be fair, this is a 3 1/2 star bok for me. Though when the collection falls flat, it falls hard-there are some stories that are just not good-it contains some of my very favorite Welty stories as well, such as "Petrified Man" and "Why I Live at the P.O." Fans of Southern Gothic literature will really appreciate this collection.


    11. Read 5 short, very short, stories for a book discussion. Although I recognize Welty's talents as a writer, I just don't get the point of the stories. Perhaps there is none. I must admit that listening to the discussion made me think about the stories more.


    12. I did not read all the short stories. I enjoyed her voice. I could visualize what she was saying, however some of the stories I finished thinking "now what was the point of that story?". Maybe there was no point, maybe it was just a snapshot of someone's life. I am not the one to say.


    13. After a long break from reading short stories, I found myself immersed and addicted to Welty's idiosyncratic world. Got me thinking about my grandmother, Kayaco, who, although no southerner, is just as zesty as a Welty character. You can read my full review at: the-reading-list


    14. I didn't get much out of the stories leading up to it, but it was the author's racism (even if she thought she was being liberal) in Keela, the Outcast Indian Maiden that made me decide to stop reading this.



    15. I re-read some of these stories for a book group recently and was astonished at Welty's economy and grace. What a writer! And not read enough these days, I'm afraid.


    16. I finally finished reading this collection of stories by iconic Southern author Welty, and all the promise of authentic dialogue and deft characterization is true.



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