The Hitler Myth: Image and Reality in the Third Reich

The Hitler Myth Image and Reality in the Third Reich Few if any twentieth century political leaders have enjoyed greater popularity among their own people than Hitler did in the decade or so following his rise to power in The personality of Hitle

  • Title: The Hitler Myth: Image and Reality in the Third Reich
  • Author: Ian Kershaw
  • ISBN: 9780192822345
  • Page: 209
  • Format: Paperback
  • Few, if any, twentieth century political leaders have enjoyed greater popularity among their own people than Hitler did in the decade or so following his rise to power in 1933 The personality of Hitler himself, however, can scarcely explain this immense popularity or his political effectiveness in the 1930s and 40s His hold over the German people lay rather in the hopesFew, if any, twentieth century political leaders have enjoyed greater popularity among their own people than Hitler did in the decade or so following his rise to power in 1933 The personality of Hitler himself, however, can scarcely explain this immense popularity or his political effectiveness in the 1930s and 40s His hold over the German people lay rather in the hopes and perceptions of the millions who adored him Based largely on the reports of government officials, party agencies, and political opponents, Ian Kershaw s groundbreaking study charts the creation, growth, and decline of the Hitler myth He demonstrates how the manufactured Fuhrer cult served as a crucial integrating force within the Third Reich and a vital element in the attainment of Nazi political aims Masters of the new techniques of propaganda, the Nazis used image building to exploit the beliefs, phobias, and prejudices of the day Kershaw greatly enhances our understanding of the German people s attitudes and behavior under Nazi rule and the psychology behind their adulation of Hitler.

    • Þ The Hitler Myth: Image and Reality in the Third Reich || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ Ian Kershaw
      209 Ian Kershaw
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      Posted by:Ian Kershaw
      Published :2019-04-19T14:28:28+00:00

    About "Ian Kershaw"

    1. Ian Kershaw

      Professor Sir Ian Kershaw is a British historian, noted for his biographies of Adolf Hitler Ian Kershaw studied at Liverpool BA and Oxford D Phil He was a lecturer first in medieval, then in modern, history at the University of Manchester In 1983 4 he was Visiting Professor of Modern History at the Ruhr University in Bochum, West Germany From 1987 to 1989 he was Professor of Modern History at the University of Nottingham, and since 1989 has been Professor of Modern History at Sheffield He is a fellow of the British Academy, of the Royal Historical Society, of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, and of the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung in Bonn He retired from academic life in the autumn semester of 2008.

    500 thoughts on “The Hitler Myth: Image and Reality in the Third Reich”

    1. A political overview of the Hitler image (I prefer the word “image” which implies, I think, something less positive than the word “myth”). Kershaw’s theory is that Hitler camouflaged his warrior intentions from the German people and presented a more Nationalistic-Messianic image to the German people. It is this messianic image which should have set off alarm bells – it did, but to too few people (Winston Churchill was one who recognized the odiousness and lethality of it). The German [...]


    2. This is a book that, having read Ian Kershaw's massive two-volume biography of Adolf Hitler (which he wrote afterward), I didn't think I needed to read. Now I realize how wrong I was; this is one of the absolute must-reads for anyone seeking to understand how the Third Reich functioned.Kershaw's focus in this book is on Hitler's popularity and its role in legitimizing the regime. Using Max Weber's formulation of "charismatic authority," he examines the rise of the "leadership cult" around Hitler [...]


    3. A good read on Hitlers propaganda machine. Failure to properly address the treatment of Jews earned it a 3 Star.


    4. One of the most pressing and difficult to answer questions of the 20th century remains why did the German people embrace Hitler. Ask the guy sitting next to you at a bar and you may get a simple answer. Read Ian Kershaw, one of the finest scholars on the Third Reich (and author of the unparalleled, two-volume Hitler biography), and you gain an understanding of the complex, larger historical forces at work in Germany long before most Germans would become familiar with the beer hall agitator.What [...]


    5. A lot of this is pretty dry. Kershaw basically mines the opinion polls and reports from the field (from both the Nazi Party and its opponents) from the 1930s on to give us snapshots of how popular or unpopular Hitler was, when, and where. One of the interesting things you realize, the more you read about the Third Reich, is just how granular the opinion on Hitler was. You can make some generalizations, but not really all that many. It might be that Hitler was hugely popular at particular times, [...]


    6. An excellent look at the creation,perpetuation and eventual demise of the Hitler myth.Largely a creation of the Nazi press through the auspices of Joseph Goebbels,the myth of Hitler grew and grew until at the pinnacle of his powers, after the surrender of France,he became a god to millions.It was about this point that Hitler started to believe the myth himself and from the point of view of the Nazi regime it all started to fall apartThe strange thing about the myth is that Hitler himself became [...]


    7. An excellent review and analysis of the creation of the personality cult around Hitler and the key role it played in enabling the Nazis to gain and keep power. Hitler was immensely, genuinely popular - much more so than the Nazi party - well into the later stages of the war. Kershaw's analysis includes many invaluable lessons that still apply today. One that especially resonated for me regarded how the combination of dire circumstances, the recognition and exploitation of peoples already existin [...]


    8. As with Robert Overy's The Dictators, Kershaw's book was incredibly helpful to me for my extended project on Nazi Germany, in addition to be well-written.


    9. Oddly enough, I found an excellent one sentence summation of the thesis of this book in the next book I picked up, H. W. Koch's The Hitler Youth: Origins and Development 1922-1945 (1975): "Since he [Hitler] never said what he meant by 'nationalism' or by 'socialism' he could be, at least for a time, all things to all men" (p. 41). Kershaw's book is an examination of the public image of Hitler, particularly among non-Nazis, and how he managed to stay "all things to all men" for a phenomenally lon [...]


    10. Written by one of the leading experts on Nazi Germany, The Hitler Myth: Image and Reality in the Third Reich is a well-researched and incredibly in-depth look at the way in which the cult of personality surrounding Adolf Hitler was carefully constructed. Kershaw delves into Germany's complex and fascinating history in an attempt to explain how the Nazis were able to win over large sections of the population, many of whom, scarred by war and economic devastation, yearned for a strong and powerful [...]


    11. For those Catholic-bashers out there, Kershaw points out that Catholic leadership vocally resisted Nazi doctrine and openly attacked Hitler as "the incarnation of evil". For their efforts, heroic resistors such as Dr. Fritz Gerlich and Fr. Ingbert Naab were murdered or sent to the concentration camps. There exists, especially in the United States, a popular misconception that the Holocaust was the product of 'good people doing nothing'. Many good people did stand up to the Nazis and paid for it [...]


    12. Incisively written, well-sourced, and conceptually translucent, Kershaw's work allowed me to better under the Hitler myth's content, timeline, paradoxes, and limitations far better than any work I've yet read. Of particular thematic resonance, Kershaw persistently notes the unvarying separation of Hitler the "leader" and Hitler "the statesman" from the more brutish, functional, and corrupt elements of his own NSDAP, a tactic absolutely crucial to the continued elevation of the Hitler myth, and o [...]


    13. Examining the origins of the near psychotic devotion to Hitler's popular image shared by the German public in the 1930s, expressed in everything from trite poetry to altar worship, Kershaw shows its relation to both the myth of a "völkisch hero-leader" prevalent at the time, and to the all-encompassing propaganda. Contrasting sharply with the generally negative views of the NSDAP, the Führer worship, essentially meeting its demise by the defeat at Stalingrad, must be understood as arising from [...]


    14. Very good, as I would expect from Ian Kershaw, this is an especially good book to read if you're looking for a introduction on nazism and the Church struggle. Fairly accessible although you do need a bit of background to this period to get the full benefit from it.Obviously the main body charts how Hitler was percieved by the German people at the start, middle and end of his reign. Very well researched and a must for any serious student of this period.


    15. Less concerned with Hitler's actual policies than with the "propaganda image-building process, and above all with the reception of this image by the German people." The Hitler myth was used to establish consensus, created both by Goebbels propaganda, and by the masses. Kerhsaw conceives of Hitler as a Weberian "charismatic leader", the myth breaks down over the course of the war.


    16. This was actually really good. Kershaw does a great job of showing how the public received mythical ideals of Hitler and how they impacted public opinion. The book can be a bit disorganized at times because of the sheer volume of information Kershaw covers, but nonetheless it is a fun historical read.


    17. Excellent analysis of the "cult of personality" of Hitler that justly points to the complicity of "average Germans" and casual anti-Semitism. Sort of frightening how little Europe has changed in this respect, actually, considering.


    18. My comments at the time:Rather dry - 3-4 footnotes per paperback-sized page. Also, assumes detailed knowledge of the history of that period. But despite all that, the information itself was very interesting.


    19. The book is well researched and Kershaw's arguments are supported by plenty of evidence, but I found his generous distribution of double negatives to be highly frustrating. This problem aside, the book is excellent.


    20. Another brilliant and exhaustively researched piece of work by Kershaw. You can't do without it if you're serious about the 3rd Reich or WWII.



    21. Okay it may not be the most entertaining read on the Third Reich, (and thats not to say it isnt entertaining), but it is well researched and is bit of an eye-opener. An enjoyable read.



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