Hip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization

Hip Hop Japan Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization In this lively ethnography Ian Condry interprets Japan s vibrant hip hop scene explaining how a music and culture that originated halfway around the world is appropriated and remade in Tokyo clubs an

  • Title: Hip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization
  • Author: Ian Condry
  • ISBN: 9780822338925
  • Page: 112
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this lively ethnography Ian Condry interprets Japan s vibrant hip hop scene, explaining how a music and culture that originated halfway around the world is appropriated and remade in Tokyo clubs and recording studios Illuminating different aspects of Japanese hip hop, Condry chronicles how self described yellow B Boys express their devotion to black culture, how thIn this lively ethnography Ian Condry interprets Japan s vibrant hip hop scene, explaining how a music and culture that originated halfway around the world is appropriated and remade in Tokyo clubs and recording studios Illuminating different aspects of Japanese hip hop, Condry chronicles how self described yellow B Boys express their devotion to black culture, how they combine the figure of the samurai with American rapping techniques and gangsta imagery, and how underground artists compete with pop icons to define real Japanese hip hop He discusses how rappers manipulate the Japanese language to achieve rhyme and rhythmic flow and how Japan s female rappers struggle to find a place in a male dominated genre Condry pays particular attention to the messages of emcees, considering how their raps take on subjects including Japan s education system, its sex industry, teenage bullying victims turned schoolyard murderers, and even America s handling of the war on terror.Condry attended than 120 hip hop performances in clubs in and around Tokyo, sat in on dozens of studio recording sessions, and interviewed rappers, music company executives, music store owners, and journalists Situating the voices of Japanese artists in the specific nightclubs where hip hop is performed what musicians and fans call the genba actual site of the scene he draws attention to the collaborative, improvisatory character of cultural globalization He contends that it was the pull of grassroots connections and individual performers rather than the push of big media corporations that initially energized and popularized hip hop in Japan Zeebra, DJ Krush, Crazy A, Rhymester, and a host of other artists created Japanese rap, one performance at a time.

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      Published :2019-04-16T09:21:01+00:00

    About "Ian Condry"

    1. Ian Condry

      Ian Condry Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Hip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization book, this is one of the most wanted Ian Condry author readers around the world.

    732 thoughts on “Hip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization”

    1. There's so much densely packed in this ethnographic study of Hip Hop in Japan that I can't do it justice here. What I most appreciate about Condry's work here is how he bends over backwards - should I bring in a b-boy-ism to avoide the cliche, like 'he windmills around'? - to avoid dichotomies and binaries. He shows how Hip Hop in Japan can be progressive in its addressing Japan's racism towards Koreans, Ainu, Burakamin, etc while still fueling homophobia. He shows how uses of English in the lyr [...]


    2. It has been a long time since I read this, but I still remember that the main appeal of this book was that it was one of the few books to tackle the topic of the Japanese hip hop scene in the English language. Out of that, the book falls short of being an innovative account of rap scene, focusing less on Japanese Rap, and more in Japanese Rap as a phenomena of 'cultural globalization' and its comparisons to the American scene. This would be an ok choice if it didn't result in many other problems [...]


    3. Firstly, I would like to state that prior to reading this book I had no idea that Japan even had a hip-hop culture. Coming into this book with no knowledge whatsoever, I found the topic very fascinating. The book at times was interesting enough to hold my attention continuously, while at other times the text got bogged down by deeply esoteric terms. While this is an ethnography, and in that an academic treatise, I do not feel that such language needs to alienate a casual reader. Condry did good [...]


    4. In this ethnography of Japanese hip hop, the author Condry focuses one of the four elements which constitute hip hop culture: rap. It is because rap has much more to do with language than deejaying, breaking or graffiti, and it, therefore, reflects the characteristics of Japanese hip hop most eloquently.Condry consciously avoids using easy dichotomies and binaries; globalization or localization, party rap or underground hip hop, market success or hard core fandom, and the likes. Instead, he uses [...]


    5. Well written, academic investigation of the current (2006) state of hip hop in Japan.I really liked the book in part because it did dispel some misconceptions I think I harbored as a longtime fan of hip hop domestically. Namely, that there was something imitative and lacking in authenticity in adapting the form to less racially charged, less heterogeneous demographic. Clearly, from Condry's research I was not seeing the ways in which: a) Japan is also a heterogeneous culture (Korean Japanese and [...]


    6. This is definitely a scholarly approach to the subject, so if you're looking for something very personable and entertaining, you might be a bit disappointed. But if you're like me and interested in the global spread of hip-hop, you'll probably enjoy it more. I highly recommend reading this in a place internet is accessible so you can key up songs quoted or mentioned by the author and listen to them while you go (I was lucky enough to already have the majority of the mentioned songs on my mp3 pla [...]


    7. Twas sort of like being back at university, since it's an ethnographyPretty self-indulgent one at that, since the guy basically goes clubbing, hangs out with his mates and writes about it. Not a bad life.


    8. Good look at how hip hop culture has taken root in Japan. Nice discussion of performance space, the music industry, linguistics, and gender.



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