The Ukimwi Road

The Ukimwi Road The Ukimwi Road is the riveting account of renowned traveler Dervla Murphy s most intrepid journey yet miles by bicycle through the heart of sub Saharan Africa a region that has recently drawn

  • Title: The Ukimwi Road
  • Author: Dervla Murphy
  • ISBN: 9780006548027
  • Page: 204
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Ukimwi Road is the riveting account of renowned traveler Dervla Murphy s most intrepid journey yet 3,000 miles by bicycle through the heart of sub Saharan Africa, a region that has recently drawn the world s attention as an epicenter of the AIDS epidemic ukimwi is Swahili for AIDS Along her route from Kenya through Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia to ZimbabweThe Ukimwi Road is the riveting account of renowned traveler Dervla Murphy s most intrepid journey yet 3,000 miles by bicycle through the heart of sub Saharan Africa, a region that has recently drawn the world s attention as an epicenter of the AIDS epidemic ukimwi is Swahili for AIDS Along her route from Kenya through Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia to Zimbabwe Dervla Murphy observed the harrowing problems of the people among whom she traveled She witnessed the devastating effects of AIDS, drought and economic collapse on the land, as well as the skepticism of Africans about Western development projects and aid schemes which promise so much but deliver so little She also discovered a wide range of reactions to AIDS, which has reached epidemic proportions in Africa, and which poses a new and mysterious threat to traditional family life.

    • ☆ The Ukimwi Road || í PDF Read by ☆ Dervla Murphy
      204 Dervla Murphy
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ The Ukimwi Road || í PDF Read by ☆ Dervla Murphy
      Posted by:Dervla Murphy
      Published :2019-08-21T02:39:39+00:00

    About "Dervla Murphy"

    1. Dervla Murphy

      Dervla Murphy is an Irish touring cyclist and author of adventure travel books for over 40 years She is best known for her 1965 book Full Tilt Ireland to India With a Bicycle, about an overland cycling trip through Europe, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India Murphy is a famous speaker and writer on Palestinian issues She seeks the dissolution of Israel in its entirety.Murphy normally travels alone and unaided, without luxuries and depending on the hospitality of local people When not travelling, Murphy lives in Lis, as she has for most of her life.

    698 thoughts on “The Ukimwi Road”

    1. While this is classic 'Dervla', for me it was much less enjoyable reading than I have come to expect from her. This is purely down to the time and the place - Southern Africa - Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia - in 1992. Aids really was reaching epidemic proportions, and yet the lack of understanding or acceptance by everyday Africans was an all time low. Basically denial.In this book, Dervla, on her trusty bicycle follows a trail from one country to the next, interacting as Derlva doe [...]


    2. Ms. Dervla Murphy, an intrepid and brave woman, takes us on a bicycle journey in Southeastern Africa (Kenya to Uganda to Tanzania to Malawi to Zambia and finally Zimbabwe). We experience these countries via her bicycle and her opinionated eyes.I did some cycling in North America when I was much younger; Ms. Murphy is doing this at the age of sixty on roads that are far tougher than anything here in North America – many of her roads were unpaved. She definitely has an iron constitution!The vita [...]


    3. Reading it in 2012 I found myself viewing it more as a historical travel book. I found the writing to be disjointed - some excellent descriptions of the landscape followed by long winded historical information often quoted rather than summarized. I would also say that I found Murphy to be very judgemental maybe even cynical about many of the people she encountered along the way as well as the various situations the villages and towns found themselves in. I plowed through to the end because every [...]


    4. Murphy takes this bike ride across Africa when she is sixty years old, certainly an inspiration. This book also seems a little more thoughtful and less given to large generalizations about people and cultures than the other book I read by her, Cameroon with Egbert. A good travel/mild adventure book.


    5. 60 year old Waterford writer, Dervla Murphy cycles from Nairobi to Zimbadwe in 1992 and finds the journey dominated by the AIDS epidemic - ukimwi being the KiSwhaili word for AIDS. The author encounters extreme continuous poverty and suffering and struggles with feminism and racial equality as many of those she encounters do not accept either - though they suffer from them. The up-sides are the people themselves, being largely kind and generous, and the scenary. Violence and political unrest are [...]


    6. This was a fun book to read. Murphy's observations are amusing and well-written, and presented in a matter-of-fact way that (generally) avoids excessive romanticism about Africa and Africans. The AIDS narrative running through the book was also interesting to me, as I'd just read 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa (written in the mid 2000s) a few weeks earlier. Murphy's book provided a trip further back in time to the early 90s, before treatment was an option in Africa, and while many countries were [...]


    7. Ukimwi, AIDS, the "slim disease." The epidemic permeated everywhere Dervla Murphy went and in every conversation she had along her four month bike ride through sub-saharan and southern Africa in the early 1990s. It was actually written a bit drily for how dire the subject matter was. It was tough to read the descriptions of the havoc this epidemic had wreaked on the African population. After AIDS, the next most common topic of conversation was Western Aid--equally interesting, equally drily writ [...]


    8. Readable but quite boring, a bit like digesting a series of lengthy emails from your eccentric elderly aunt about her recent bicycle trip in Africa. I suspect this is the intended effect anyway - despite her reputation for self-effacement, Dervla Murphy spends the greater part of the book cultivating an image of herself as doughty adventurer with a thoroughly clear-sighted understanding of the world's problems. This begins to grate after a while. Less so when she is documenting yet another jolly [...]


    9. This is actually my second time reading this book. I noticed several reviews that pan Murphy's insane trip by bike through forbidding territory and I feel these people just didn't "get" her. Therefore, I'd like to copy out my favorite line from the book which sums her up for me, and it's on p. 125 of the hardback from a scene in Uganda where she is trying to buy milk. "I noticed Bushenyi's little milk depot and rejoiced, fresh milk being my No.2 addiction (the attentive reader will by now have d [...]


    10. Appalling. I browsed this while waiting for an appointment with my dentist. I managed to plough through 2 chapters before deciding that going ahead with the dental appointment was a better idea. The writing is so poor that I imagined myself seeing Dervla Murphy pushing that miserable bicycle down the road and immediately running her over. I cannot get myself to give it even a single star.


    11. A great book by an inspiring, intrepid travel writer. Africa leaps of the page at you and her perceptive commentary on colonialism are excellent. rWritten some time ago-in early 1990s, it is salutary to think how unlikely is that things have improved since then.


    12. So it is pretty hardcore to bike from Kenya to Zimbabwe when yr 60, and Dervla Murphy is as responsible and informed as tourists get, but I still can't help be annoyed at travel writers who seem to think that they are the only ones who have been responsible tourists in the places that they go.


    13. This is a carefully observed and fascinating account of a bicycle ride through East Africa, along what has become the first to AIDS Trail. I have done more travelling and then reading of travel writing, but now I'm really enjoying travelling the easy way, in my armchair!


    14. Dervla examines the aids epidemic in a telling way with lots of human stories. Like the truckdriver whose three wives always make sure one of them is travelling with him so that they don't all catch aids.




    15. I would have given it five stars except it was a spiritually difficult read- but certainly an inspiration for the possibilites in store for age 60.


    16. Too many times we ask "why" not really caring to understand the true difference between our culture and theirsis book answers those questions excellent read




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