Flintlock and Tomahawk: New England in King Philips's War

Flintlock and Tomahawk New England in King Philips s War This classic account of King Philip s War first published in offers a bird s eye view of the conflict from the Wampanoag sachem s rise to his ultimate defeat The battles massacres stratagems

  • Title: Flintlock and Tomahawk: New England in King Philips's War
  • Author: Douglas Edward Leach
  • ISBN: 9780940160552
  • Page: 495
  • Format: Paperback
  • This classic account of King Philip s War, first published in 1958, offers a bird s eye view of the conflict, from the Wampanoag sachem s rise to his ultimate defeat The battles, massacres, stratagems, and logistics of this war are all detailed, with the leaders of both sides figuring prominently in this tale of bloodshed, privation, and woe The author weighs all the facThis classic account of King Philip s War, first published in 1958, offers a bird s eye view of the conflict, from the Wampanoag sachem s rise to his ultimate defeat The battles, massacres, stratagems, and logistics of this war are all detailed, with the leaders of both sides figuring prominently in this tale of bloodshed, privation, and woe The author weighs all the factors contributing to the Native Americans defeat and surveys the effects of the war on the lives of both Indians and colonists in the years to come With insight, balance, and compassion, Leach portrays the tragedy of the war and points toward the future of the nascent American republic.

    • [PDF] Download ä Flintlock and Tomahawk: New England in King Philips's War | by Ä Douglas Edward Leach
      495 Douglas Edward Leach
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ä Flintlock and Tomahawk: New England in King Philips's War | by Ä Douglas Edward Leach
      Posted by:Douglas Edward Leach
      Published :2019-08-11T00:15:36+00:00

    About "Douglas Edward Leach"

    1. Douglas Edward Leach

      A leading authority on 17th century colonial American history Douglas Edward Leach was born in Providence, Rhode Island, 27 May, 1920 After graduating Phi Beta Kappa from Brown University in 1942, he served as a deck officer in the U.S Navy Following World War II, he earned his M.A 1947 and Ph.D 1952 from Harvard University Leach began his career as a history professor at Bates College, Lewiston, Maine, where he taught from 1950 until 1956 In 1956, he joined the faculty at Vanderbilt University where he remained until his retirement in 1986.

    614 thoughts on “Flintlock and Tomahawk: New England in King Philips's War”

    1. I grew up in Massachusetts but I knew squat about King Philip's War until I was well out of college. It's not "taught" in most high school and college American history courses, which is a shame. This war (and it was a vicious war, with both sides looking to crush the other) claimed thousands of lives of both combatants and non-combatant elders, women and children, resulted in huge property losses of colonial towns, farms, Indian settlements, crops, livestock, and, in the end, destroyed forever n [...]


    2. An older book which may be considered not politically correct these days, but a well written classic story of the event.


    3. Flintlock and Tomahawk is a very well researched and easily read monograph, detailing what history has come to refer to as King Phillip's War, which was considered when it was first published in 1958, to also be quite well written. So proclaimed Samuel Eliot Morison, in the Introduction to this Norton Edition released eight years later. However by the politically correct standards of the twenty-first century, it is written in a language and tone grievously steeped in unenlightened bigotry toward [...]


    4. Flintlock and Tomahawk is a very well researched and easily read monograph, detailing what history has come to refer to as King Phillip's War, which was considered when it was first published in 1958, to also be quite well written. So proclaimed Samuel Eliot Morison, in the Introduction to this Norton Edition released eight years later. However by the politically correct standards of the twenty-first century, it is written in a language and tone grievously steeped in unenlightened bigotry toward [...]


    5. I can't review "Flintlock and Tomahawk", published in the 1950s, without first remarking on the book's language: with the free use of words like "savages" and "like wild animals" this book was easy to put down and often hard to pick up again. So why did I continue? Because so many later authors who have examined the conflict known as King Philip's War with more racial sensitivity have continued to use Leach's work as a reference. And once I got past the "savages" and Manifest Destiny rhetoric it [...]


    Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *