The Distant Suns

The Distant Suns A Cornelius novel by Michael Moorcock co written with Philp James and illustrated by James Cawthorn originally serialized in eighteen instalments in the Bombay based The Illustrated Weekly of Indi

  • Title: The Distant Suns
  • Author: Michael Moorcock Philip James
  • ISBN: 9780450501043
  • Page: 356
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Cornelius novel by Michael Moorcock, co written with Philp James and illustrated by James Cawthorn, originally serialized, in eighteen instalments, in the Bombay based The Illustrated Weekly of India between June and November 1969 before being re published for the English market by Unicorn Books in 1975 Philip James is a pseudonym for James Cawthorn, who took over theA Cornelius novel by Michael Moorcock, co written with Philp James and illustrated by James Cawthorn, originally serialized, in eighteen instalments, in the Bombay based The Illustrated Weekly of India between June and November 1969 before being re published for the English market by Unicorn Books in 1975 Philip James is a pseudonym for James Cawthorn, who took over the writing of the serial when Moorcock fell ill.

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      356 Michael Moorcock Philip James
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      Published :2019-08-01T01:44:02+00:00

    About "Michael Moorcock Philip James"

    1. Michael Moorcock Philip James

      Michael John Moorcock is an English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels Moorcock has mentioned The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Apple Cart by George Bernard Shaw and The Constable of St Nicholas by Edward Lester Arnold as the first three books which captured his imagination He became editor of Tarzan Adventures in 1956, at the age of sixteen, and later moved on to edit Sexton Blake Library As editor of the controversial British science fiction magazine New Worlds, from May 1964 until March 1971 and then again from 1976 to 1996, Moorcock fostered the development of the science fiction New Wave in the UK and indirectly in the United States His serialization of Norman Spinrad s Bug Jack Barron was notorious for causing British MPs to condemn in Parliament the Arts Council s funding of the magazine.During this time, he occasionally wrote under the pseudonym of James Colvin, a house pseudonym used by other critics on New Worlds A spoof obituary of Colvin appeared in New Worlds 197 January 1970 , written by William Barclay another Moorcock pseudonym Moorcock, indeed, makes much use of the initials JC , and not entirely coincidentally these are also the initials of Jesus Christ, the subject of his 1967 Nebula award winning novella Behold the Man, which tells the story of Karl Glogauer, a time traveller who takes on the role of Christ They are also the initials of various Eternal Champion Moorcock characters such as Jerry Cornelius, Jerry Cornell and Jherek Carnelian In recent years, Moorcock has taken to using Warwick Colvin, Jr as yet another pseudonym, particularly in his Second Ether fiction.

    358 thoughts on “The Distant Suns”

    1. I am sorry but I didn't enjoy this novel at all. It was by far the worst Moorcock book. Well I have not read that many but I didn't enjoy this one. So we've got a mix between The Black Corridor and Warrior of Mars - but it sucked.Humanity has come far to destroy our own planet with overpopulation and tension between nations. We've exhausted our own resources so what can humanity do? Send a colonization ship and destroy another planet. Yeah that will work. Stupid premises. Humanity can solve her [...]


    2. As I finished the book, I kept looking for evidence that this was actually a hoax of some kind, because the back story about how and why the book was written was appallingly insulting to the literary community of India.According to the preface, the book was written for the purpose of introducing science fiction to India. That's odd, because it was already there. No, really, this was to introduce scientific science fiction to India, to counteract all that religion and superstition which abounded [...]


    3. Originally published on my blog here in January 2002.The Distant Suns is a strong contender for the title of Moorcock's worst novel. Almost totally different in style from his other writing, it is an unimaginative story about a space mission to Alpha Centauri, outdated in style and bearing a marked resemblance to American pulp fiction of twenty or more years earlier. It is so different that it is impossible to read it without wondering just how much input Moorcock had to the collaboration, even [...]


    4. The first half of the book has a nice science-fiction focus, and even though it's shinier and more pulpy than Moorcock's norm, it's still enjoyable. Unfortunately, the latter half of the book descends into planetary romance that's just not very interesting, as a confusingly named array of confusingly named people rush hither and yon. It feels out of tune with the first part of the book and not that good either. Cawthorn tries to save the story with some touchbacks to what's going on on Earth, bu [...]


    5. I have read other Michael Moorcock scifi before and found this one as enjoyable. If you appreciate the more subtle and lighter classic scifi from the earlier days than you might enjoy this book. It is a quick read, and the illustrations are interesting and predictable of the period. I would recommend the book to anyone who enjoys classic scifi.


    6. 1940's space opera written in the 1960's. It is many years since I read any Michael Moorcock. This did not disappoint. Quirky, odd, and sometimes a bit hard to believe, but a good page turner. The images add some character to the whole experience, and even made me smile in a nostalgic manner.


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