Lesbo pulp

Lesbo pulp Lauded as the Queen of Lesbian Pulp for her landmark novels of the s Ann Bannon defined lesbian fiction for the pre Stonewall generation Following the release of Cleis Press new editions of Beebo

  • Title: Lesbo pulp
  • Author: Ann Bannon
  • ISBN: 9788804518310
  • Page: 489
  • Format: Paperback
  • Lauded as the Queen of Lesbian Pulp for her landmark novels of the 1950s, Ann Bannon defined lesbian fiction for the pre Stonewall generation Following the release of Cleis Press new editions of Beebo Brinker and Odd Girl Out, I Am a Woman finds sorority sister Laura Landon leaving college heartbreak behind and embracing Greenwich Villages lesbian bohemia This edition inLauded as the Queen of Lesbian Pulp for her landmark novels of the 1950s, Ann Bannon defined lesbian fiction for the pre Stonewall generation Following the release of Cleis Press new editions of Beebo Brinker and Odd Girl Out, I Am a Woman finds sorority sister Laura Landon leaving college heartbreak behind and embracing Greenwich Villages lesbian bohemia This edition includes a new introduction by the author Shameless tales of wanton dyke lust are finally unveiled

    • ✓ Lesbo pulp || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Ann Bannon
      489 Ann Bannon
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Lesbo pulp || ↠ PDF Read by ☆ Ann Bannon
      Posted by:Ann Bannon
      Published :2019-07-07T20:04:43+00:00

    About "Ann Bannon"

    1. Ann Bannon

      Ann Bannon pseudonym of Ann Weldy is an American author and academic She is known for her lesbian pulp novels, which comprise The Beebo Brinker Chronicles and earned her the title Queen of Lesbian Pulp Fiction Bannon was featured in the documentaries Before Stonewall 1984 and Forbidden Love The Unashamed Stories of Lesbian Lives 1992

    776 thoughts on “Lesbo pulp”

    1. I wanted to read some proper 50s lesbian pulp fiction and this turned out to be exactly what I expected, in both good and bad ways



    2. 1959 was a hard time to be gay or lesbian, even in Greenwich Village where (apparently) a buck could buy you three drinks in a gay bar and leave you with enough change for a phone call!Sweet young lesbian Laura Landon has run away from an overbearing father and is trying to make it on her own in the Big Apple. She falls in love with her straight roommate, becomes the obsession of a tough butch, and fails at her office job. Fortunately she has a great gay guy friend named Jack who is there for he [...]


    3. I've never read a book all the way through in one sitting, and started again from the beginning immedately, as I have with I Am a Woman.I don't like new fiction. I resist it fighting tooth and nail. My partner brought this book home to me while on an extended trip and recommended it. I'd seen Bannon's books for many years and had resisted them for some reason. I was an idiot. I must have been seated while reading this book, but I don't remember it. All I remember is being levitated right off the [...]


    4. With apologies by the author for the silly title this is a truly great pulp lesbian novel, actually it's truly great period. Maybe it was growing up in a repressive evangelical christian household in a tiny village but I so identified with the frustration and repression faced by the queer characters in this book. They were all so passionate, it seemed like nearly all the conversations were fights, or mixtures of sarcasm and wit. It was a lovely idealistic portrayal of queer life in New York. The [...]


    5. It's cheesy, it's melodramatic, it's not exactly poetry-- in short, it's pulp. But it's damn delicious, like a big bowl of Lucky Charms marshmallows. I couldn't help comparing it to "Stone Butch Blues" what with the 50s New York gay bar scene setting, but "I Am A Woman" is infinitely more readable and charming and I'd recommend it above "Blues" to anyone interested in pre-Stonewall gay bar history. I can't really fault it for any of its shortcomings (Laura's changing backstory, her dad's supervi [...]


    6. Laura Landon is somewhat less self-hating than she was in Odd Girl Out, but she is still pretty freaking annoying. Also totally outshined by the cynical alcoholic Jack Mann, who introduces her to '50s Greenwich Village gay culture, and butch-tastic Beebo Brinker.



    7. Kept me turning the pages but the plot was a bit scattered. The characterization was great, even if I didn't agree with some (many) of their actions. The ending was way too fast. Looking forward to seeing what happens between those two in the next book.


    8. Though Ann Bannon’s novel I Am a Woman is somewhat of a schlocky and fun romp of genre fiction (though I don’t know if the genre lesbian fiction is appropriate, but the novel’s written in such a direct emotional way, in the manner of the crime or horror or romance fiction of the era) it offers a glimpse into an emerging figure in our culture, one that was impossible to write about before the 1950s, and certainly quite risky to write about even at that time, the “out” lesbian. Lesbianis [...]


    9. This is a 1950's lesbian pulp fiction work from Ann Bannon, and includes an introduction, written in 2001.It's a marvelous book about love. Laura is twenty, and has fled from life with her father to move to New York. Her father was abusive, both physically and verbally to her. She had also had a love affair with a girl, Beth, but the girl ended up getting married to a man.In New York, Laura moves into a place and becomes the roommate of a woman named Marcie who has an ex-husband that she still a [...]


    10. I found three of the Bannon novels next to one another on the "new" shelf at the library and snapped them up. Was that unfair? Perhaps, but I'll try to return them quickly.I wasn't expecting much from Beebo Brinker before I read it, which contributed to how much I enjoyed it. I was trying to keep my expectations low for this as well (because---shockingly---I am totally fascinated with Beebo and I knew she was a more minor character), and was again surprised.Sam keeps making fun of me for reading [...]


    11. In I Am a Woman, the second book in the Beebo Brinker series, Laura has left college after breaking up with Beth. Beth is now married, and Laura returned home to Chicago to live with her father. But unable to stomach life with him, Laura runs away to New York City, where she is introduced to the Greenwich Village gay scene.There are some large discrepancies between the first book in the series (Odd Girl Out) and this book. In Odd Girl Out, Laura's mother is still alive, and her parents have just [...]


    12. Ok, I really just loved this for the trashiness of it. Other than that, (1) the overly dramatic plot seems considerably more realistic when you bear in mind that the protagonist is 20 years old. (2) There was a very surprising, random, 1950s racial segregation reference, which was a sobering moment in the middle of all the push and pull of high drama. People really think differently at different times, which is palpable in some other scenes too - at least regarding sexual morals. (3) For me, who [...]


    13. I am a Woman, by Ann Bannon, Narrated by Kate Rudd, Produced by Cleis Press, and downloaded from audible.The second book in the five-book Beebo Brinker series. This book, also with a newly revised foreword by the author, appeared in 2002 re-published by Kleis Press and also remains very popular. This book sees Laura leaving school, going back to Chicago to live with her father and work at a job he found her, only to leave his house forever after a year because he is so abusive to her. She comes [...]


    14. There is nothing like reading an Ann Bannon book to renew your sense of historical privilege; I personally like to pause every dozen pages or so and reflect on how relatively easy it is for my modern queer butt to go out and get some action and otherwise live a happy, satisfying life. Read her books for their period detail, but also for their unfailingly earnest intensity of emotion- say you love me, do! Oh, i could die just to hear you breathe those simple words in my heaving ear!- good stuff. [...]


    15. "Below her, around her on all sides, sparkled New York. It honked and shouted down there, it murmured and sighed, it blinked and glittered like a gorgeous whore waiting to be conquered. Laura breathed deeply and smiled secretly at it. She could live with a dank front hall and patched-up elevator for a view like this.""Marcie was one of those people with the rare gift of intimacy. You knew her for a few minutes, an hour, a couple of days, and you discovered to your surprise that you felt close to [...]


    16. Hey, it's lesbian pulp. No need to go all theoretical with it--and on that note, it's a fun, accessible novel. I breezed through it, more or less, and thought Bannon was surprisingly 'smart' for writing what has been seen as the dykey version of Harlequin romances. She has a great sense of humor, though I found some things a bit problematic. The dominant/submissive models of relationships, for instance--not that I have anything against it in a real-life setting, but Bannon certainly makes it see [...]


    17. This is the second ofAnn Bannon's pulp novels from the 50's and early 60's. In the first book, Laura essentially had her coming out experience and left college. In this one she arrives in Greenwich Village and has some tortured adventures.Never having lived through the Dark Ages, I can't say how accurately life is portrayed. It seemed to me that the behavior of just about every character in the book was more or less insane. But, I wanted to get a sense of what the literature of the time was like [...]


    18. Lurid covers aside, Ann Bannon managed to tackle very serious subject matters in her books. This is a second book in series, it could be read as a stand alone, but I recommend reading them in order. We follow Laura as she moves to NY and tries to become her own person, to find herself. Gay activity was not even legal at the time and it is fascinating to see how the characters in the book navigated the world that was so unwelcoming to them. This is also the book where we meet the famous Beebo Bri [...]


    19. My favorite of the pulps I've read. Ridiculously campy and overly dramatic. But, it portrays the most engrossing scene of queer life in the 50's so far. It delves into being closeted at work and navigating the bar scene, and dabbles in family relations. Requisite troubled father/daughter relationship and roommate crush. Gay man best friend, us-against-the-world mentality, and some authentic, if currently questionable, racial terms.


    20. I love this book because it's a gay version of so many of your typical romance novels. The characters are melodramatic. The main character cries far too much and I don't think I'd even want to be her friend, but it's so normal in it's plot and simplicity, while being historical and providing a feeling of community.


    21. I'm new to reading lesbian pulp fiction, and I really enjoyed this. Okay, it can get a bit hokey and melodramatic at times, but it's still a really engaging story. Definitely want to read more. Any recommendations?


    22. Laura just wants to be a normal college girl and quit school to marry the hunky jock-cum-doctor. Unfortunately, she finds herself in bed with other women! Not the plan! Also not in the plans is being found out for a "deviant"!


    23. My friend Mike loaned this to me, saying I'd get a kick out of it. It was trashy and not as sexy as you'd think. The dialogue was wonderfully inane. It's quite an interesting cultural artifact. Do I think it's a fine work of literature? No. Did I enjoy the hell out of it? Oh yeah.


    24. Me encanta, es una historia fascinante. Para ser de los cincuenta es muy explicito en ciertos aspectos. Ademas quien dijo que este tipo de historias (en esta epoca) no tenian final feliz, se equivocaba.


    25. "Below her, around her on all sides, sparkled New York. It honked and shouted down there, it murmured and sighed, it blinked and glittered like a gorgeous whore waiting to be conquered."haha, oh Ann Bannon, never change.


    26. I liked this a lot better than Odd Girl Out, but the only major thing that bothered me was the fact that Laura's background story changed in this second book. I'm not sure why the author did this, but it worked out in the end. Onward to the next one!


    27. I love lesbian pulp fiction! I want a sticker to that effect. I started with "Beebo Brinker" and seem to be working my way backwards through the series. I wish I would have had these books circa ages 11-17



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