The Green Belt Movement: Sharing the Approach and the Experience

The Green Belt Movement Sharing the Approach and the Experience Wangari Muta Maathai was born in Nyeri Kenya in In she won a Kennedy scholarship to study in America and earned a master s degree in biology from the University of Pittsburgh and became th

  • Title: The Green Belt Movement: Sharing the Approach and the Experience
  • Author: Wangari Maathai JasonBock
  • ISBN: 9781590560402
  • Page: 383
  • Format: Paperback
  • Wangari Muta Maathai was born in Nyeri, Kenya in 1940 In 1960, she won a Kennedy scholarship to study in America and earned a master s degree in biology from the University of Pittsburgh and became the first woman in East Africa to earn a Ph.D.Returning to Kenya in 1966, Wangari Maathai was shocked at the degradation of the forests and the farmland caused by deforestationWangari Muta Maathai was born in Nyeri, Kenya in 1940 In 1960, she won a Kennedy scholarship to study in America and earned a master s degree in biology from the University of Pittsburgh and became the first woman in East Africa to earn a Ph.D.Returning to Kenya in 1966, Wangari Maathai was shocked at the degradation of the forests and the farmland caused by deforestation Heavy rains had washed away much of the topsoil, silt was clogging the rivers, and fertilizers were depriving the soil of nutrients Wangari decided to solve the problem by planting trees.Under the auspices of the National Council of Women of Kenya, of which she was chairwoman from 1981 to 1987, she introduced the idea of planting trees through citizen foresters in 1976, and called this new organization the Green Belt Movement GBM She continued to develop GBM into broad based, grassroots organization whose focus was women s groups planting of trees in order to conserve the environment and improve their quality of life Through the Green Belt Movement, Wangari Maathai has assisted women in planting than 20 million trees on their farms and on schools and church compounds in Kenya and all over East Africa.In Africa, as in many parts of the world, women are responsible for meals and collecting firewood Increasing deforestation has not only meant increasing desertification, but it has also meant that women have had to travel further and further afield in order to collect the firewood This in turn has led to women spending less time around the home, tending to crops, and looking after their children By staying closer to home, earning income from sustainably harvesting the fruit and timber from trees, women not only can be productive, they can provide stability in the home They can also create time for education opportunities whether for themselves or their children.This virtuous circle of empowerment through conservation is serving as a model throughout the world, where women both individually and collectively are entrusted with money and material to invest it in ways that make a difference to their daily lives Wangari Maathai s Green Belt Movement is a great example of how one person can turn around the lives of thousands, if not millions of others, by empowering others to change their situation.Wangari s road to success was by no means easy During the 1970s and 1980s, she came under increasing scrutiny from the government of Daniel arap Moi She was frequently the target of vilification from the government, as well as subject to outright attacks and imprisonment She refused to compromise her belief that the people were best trusted to look after their natural resources, as opposed to the corrupt cronies of the government, who were given whole swathes of public land, which they then despoiled.In December 2002, Wangari Maathai was elected by an overwhelming margin to Parliament, where she is the Assistant Secretary for Environnment, Wildlife, and Natural Resources in the democratically elected Kibaki government Even though she is now being protected by the very same soldiers who once arrested her, her voice on behalf of the environment is still strong and determined.In October 2004, she capped a lifetime of incredible achievements when she was awarded the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize.In The Green Belt Movement, founder Wangari Maathai tells its story why it started, how it operates, and where it is going She includes the philosophy behind it, its challenges and objectives, and the specific steps involved in starting a similar grassroots environmental and social justice organization The Green Belt Movement is the inspiring story of people working at the grassroots level to improve their environment and their country Their story offers ideas about a new and hopeful future for Africa and the rest of the world.

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    About "Wangari Maathai JasonBock"

    1. Wangari Maathai JasonBock

      Wangari Maathai was a Kenyan environmental and political activist She was educated in the United States at Mount St a and the University of Pittsburgh, as well as the University of Nairobi in Kenya In the 1970s, Maathai founded the Green Belt Movement, an environmental non governmental organization focused on the planting of trees, environmental conservation, and women s rights In 1984, she was awarded the Right Livelihood Award, and in 2004, she became the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace Maathai was an elected member of Parliament and served as Assistant Minister for Environment and Natural Resources in the government of President Mwai Kibaki between January 2003 and November 2005.In June 2009, Maathai was named as one of PeaceByPeace s first peace heroes.Until her death, Maathai served on the Eminent Advisory Board of the Association of European Parliamentarians with Africa AWEPA.Maathai died on 25 September 2011 in Nairobi while receiving ovarian cancer treatment She was 71.Selected publicationsThe Green Belt Movement sharing the approach and the experience 1985 The bottom is heavy too even with the Green Belt Movement the Fifth Edinburgh Medal Address 1994 Bottle necks of development in Africa 1995 The Canopy of Hope My Life Campaigning for Africa, Women, and the Environment 2002 Unbowed A Memoir 2006 Reclaiming rights and resources women, poverty and environment 2007 Rainwater Harvesting 2008 State of the world s minorities 2008 events of 2007 2008 The Challenge for Africa 2009 Replenishing the Earth 2010 ISBN 978030759114 info at enpedia wiki Wangari_

    644 thoughts on “The Green Belt Movement: Sharing the Approach and the Experience”

    1. The Green Belt Movement is a rare book because it documents the experience of an African female scientist's journey into the politics of an environmental movement that has had many positive impacts on both the landscape of an East African nation as well as elevating the role of women as key leaders and activists directly shaping the ecology of their communities. It is truly an inspiring account of a human being who used her unique skill set to both move forward the conversation about environment [...]


    2. My hero. I did an intense research project on her. She received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 I believe. An amazing lady who began her movement by teaching the women and children in Africa, self worth and skill through sustainable living and environmental conservation. Pick up this book to see what wonderful things are still happening in our world, despite what is covered on the news.


    3. Basically this is a progress report of a programme, and it is awesome! What I like most though, was her personal note on why she was bothered to fight for the Green Belt Movement:"Privilese untuk bisa mengenyam pendidikan tinggi, khususnya di luar Afrika, memperluas wawasan saya dan berkontribusi pada pemahaman yang lebih dalam mengenai keterkaitan antara lingkungan, perempuan, dan pembangunan. Pendidika ini jugalah yang membantu saya memahami nilai yang terkandung dari kerja demi kemaslahatan b [...]


    4. While not high literature, this work is important for the simplicity of what it is trying to communicate and inspire in others in the way of environmental humanitarian action. It is a great way to learn about an amazing woman and the problems of Kenya. Maathai very much deserves the Nobel Price for 2004 for her work on the GBM. As a woman in an African nation capable of accomplishing such a fantastic situation for empowering woman as well as improving general circumstance.It is interesting to se [...]


    5. This is an exceptionally good book for folks looking for a broader prospective from environmental movements. Wangari Maathai shows the interconnectedness of environmental issues, women's roles and poverty in ways that often go unappreciated in many environmental groups. I highly recommend it.




    6. Sebenarnya agak memalukan betapa lamanya saya menyelesaikan buku ini. Hampir setahun dari waktu saya beli. Tapi untuk kualitas otak seperti saya ini, bisa dimengerti sebenarnya. Bukan, bukan tentang susahnya. Buku ini tidak ada susahnya sama sekali. Tapi membosankan amat sangat. Membacanya seperti membaca sebuah proposal proyek buat LSM. Informasi yang ada di sini mungkin gampang saja bisa saya dapatkan di internet dalam waktu kurang dari 3 menit.Harap maklum, saya terlalu gampang bosan. Dan kem [...]


    7. Wangari Maathai's personal account of how she came to be the "Tree Mother" of Africa is the most interesting part of this book. The story is inspiring and fascinating. Her success has been amazing.The rest of the book deals with more mundane things, like how GBM does its work and the processes it uses in the field. Those sections would only be interesting if you were thinking about replicating GBM, which might not be a bad idea.


    8. While the book itself is not incredible, the movement itself is, and therefore I enjoyed reading more about it, through the words of its founder and Nobel Prize Winner, Wangari Maathai, and I would recommend it to those interested in reforestation projects, social/community environmentalism and women's empowerment social movements.


    9. A fantastic (and short) view into how to sustain a social movement that has literally changed the lives of thousands in Kenya - and impacts us globally because of the efforts to save the environment.



    10. This is a really cool, important project. However, this book is written more like a blueprint for other people who are looking to do something similar, and so it doesn't read all that well.




    11. Maathai is a strong woman who isn't afraid to work towards making the world a better place. Planting trees saves lives.


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