The Soul of Viktor Tronko

The Soul of Viktor Tronko When Soviet agent Viktor Tronko defected to the US in he made two intriguing claims he insisted that Russia had not placed a mole inside the CIA and that Lee Harvey Oswald had not been recruite

  • Title: The Soul of Viktor Tronko
  • Author: David Quammen Nancy Pearl
  • ISBN: 9781477826119
  • Page: 226
  • Format: Paperback
  • When Soviet agent Viktor Tronko defected to the US in 1964, he made two intriguing claims he insisted that Russia had not placed a mole inside the CIA, and that Lee Harvey Oswald had not been recruited to assassinate the president Convinced that Tronko was working as a disinformation agent, the CIA furiously did everything they could to break him But Tronko had one When Soviet agent Viktor Tronko defected to the US in 1964, he made two intriguing claims he insisted that Russia had not placed a mole inside the CIA, and that Lee Harvey Oswald had not been recruited to assassinate the president Convinced that Tronko was working as a disinformation agent, the CIA furiously did everything they could to break him But Tronko had one surprise for them he refused to break.Almost two decades later, former CIA officer Mel Pokorny shows up at journalist Michael Kessler s house and offers to talk about Tronko It s the scoop of a lifetime for Kessler But the he investigates, the closer he gets to the truth a truth so shocking that someone would do anything to keep it under wraps This could be the biggest story of his life if it doesn t kill him first.Filled with fascinating characters and darkly delicious humor, The Soul of Viktor Tronko is a rich, suspenseful espionage saga inspired by a true story.

    • Ø The Soul of Viktor Tronko || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ David Quammen Nancy Pearl
      226 David Quammen Nancy Pearl
    • thumbnail Title: Ø The Soul of Viktor Tronko || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ David Quammen Nancy Pearl
      Posted by:David Quammen Nancy Pearl
      Published :2019-06-23T00:19:03+00:00

    About "David Quammen Nancy Pearl"

    1. David Quammen Nancy Pearl

      David Quammen born February 1948 is an award winning science, nature and travel writer whose work has appeared in publications such as National Geographic, Outside, Harper s, Rolling Stone, and The New York Times Book Review he has also written fiction He wrote a column called Natural Acts for Outside magazine for fifteen years Quammen lives in Bozeman, Montana.

    875 thoughts on “The Soul of Viktor Tronko”

    1. This is a spy story based on two famous KGB defectors, and a controversial CIA Counterintelligence Director. The first of the defectors, Bogdan Fedorenko (Anatoly Golitsyn in real life), in 1961, provided a lot of intelligence, including the shocking information that a senior CIA official was a Soviet spy. He also indicated that the KGB would send a false defector to do damage control, to counter this intel. The other defector Viktor Tronko (based on Yuri Nosenko) showed up in 1964, claiming tha [...]


    2. I WON A FREE COPY OF THIS BOOK FROM A GIVAWAY!!! and I was very excited to start it As I am with all the books I get(some one put a lot of hard work and effort into it might as well give it a shot.) AnywaysI liked the spy,suspense, who-dun-it type books. But this one was a little on the extreme side. ( (view spoiler)[ Was he who he said, did he know what he claimed.(hide spoiler)] ) I really didn't know what to think or who to believe I know so many people like these types of books, and I wante [...]


    3. If you like action in your fiction, forget this book. If you like listening to extensive dialogue for pages and pages, this book is for you. I read this for a book club (which is the ONLY reason I finished it).Let me clarify: the writing style of Mr. Quammen is pleasing. I would not hesitate to read any of his nonfiction work. I would hesitate to read any of his fiction.The plot of the book is summed up crudely as this: Conversation between freelance writer and about 5 people related to the inve [...]


    4. Very complex read. Much like Le Carre style books. Intricately woven plot, worth waiting for the ending. Stick with it if you can. I took a lot of notes. Would have been so much easier to read if it was availabe on the Kindle so you can look up characters easily.


    5. I won this book as a First Reads give-away. It is a Nancy Pearl Book Lust Rediscovery originally published in 1987. I am a fan of spy-novels and I think this was a great one! The story is about Viktor Tronko, who is either a Soviet defector with very little real value or a Soviet disinformation plot meant to confuse the CIA and/or end an internal mole hunt for a Soviet spy code-named Dmitri. The story unfolds as Michael Kessler gets a visit from an old CIA informant and former member of counter- [...]


    6. Boy, this was a tough one. Received it as a Christmas gift and started right in on it. At around 450 pages, it is certainly not one of the longer books I've read recently. But occasionally it seemed so. The story is slow in building and quite convoluted. A single character might be referred to by his/her given names, a code name, or, in the case of the Russians, by first and middle names. This occasionally gets wearying. Perhaps it would have been less so if I'd read the book over the course of [...]


    7. The Soul of Viktor Tronko is the third of the Nancy Purl Rediscovery series I've read, and probably my least favorite, though not to say it is not without merit.This an interesting spy novel, and more of a modern spy novel than many as it deals a lot with the internal workings of the CIA and the political infighting, but captures the height of the cold war era and what it feels like not to be so much a high-stakes James Bond type, but more a typical office worker working in counterintelligence. [...]


    8. Talk Talk TalkThe protagonist is a journalist who has given up writing about Washington intelligence agencies and retreated to New England to write about animals. He is visited by a discredited CIA official who is promptly murdered. The journalistic investigation which follows primarily consists of long conversations with former untrustworthy agents. These exhausting conversations are punctuated by pointless violence. The core questions are was there a high level Russian mole and who of the Sovi [...]


    9. This Soviet spy novel was suggested by my hero librarian, Nancy Pearl. Her book recommendations are always right on spot- exactly what I like, if I'm in the mood to read it. However, I might have tried to read this book at a bad time. Although the idea was great, with the surprise ending, the writing style was so repetitively detailed that I got bogged down in the middle. I considered re-reading this at a quieter time in the year (winter's always so busy). As far as I can remember, this is the f [...]


    10. I thought I would enjoy a step back In time to the days of the Cold War but I didn't care for this book at all. It was very slow going and I couldn't connect with the characters at all. To make matters worse the ending wasn't clear, or at least not to me, and the only reason I kept reading was to find out what had happened! If you do read, could you please explain the ending to me?


    11. The story of a Russian Spy who defects to the US. He says that the Russians did not plant a spy in the CIA and that Lee Harvey Oswald had nothing to do with Russia. Two decades later a former CIA officer and a journalist get together and the result is shocking. This is a read that keeps you on your toes.


    12. excellent but disappointingI loved the symbolism and the interesting choices for analogies which, though frequently unrelated to the setting, expressed it more clearly than can be explained. I was left unsatisfied at the end but the ending was fitting and artistic. Not an easy read. Requires thought.


    13. A classic sort of LeCarre tale, but unfortunately it's almost entirely delivered via expository dialogue in the form of interviews. Late in the book I began skimming to find out what happened instead of reading closely.


    14. Who knew Quammen wrote spy thrillers? Now I do. After halfheartedly reading this first few pages over morning coffee, I acknowledged that I really didn't care to read a Cold War espionage novel. If I do, it will be Le Carre.


    15. Excellent. Sorry I overlooked it for so many years. Literate, complex and mixes very lightly concealed historical figures of the cold war with fictional ones.



    16. Good moody, gloomy spy novel, definitely literary. Quite a departure from what I know of Quammen. Fans of LeCarre should like it





    17. I have mixed feelings about this book. On the one hand it was very well written and utterly fascinating in its detail. On the other hand, the ending was a total nonending.



    Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *