J.R.R. Tolkien's Lost English Mythology

J R R Tolkien s Lost English Mythology A path breaking account of Tolkien s Middle earth as the lost world of ancient English mythology In this essay the award winning intellectual historian Simon J Cook explores Tolkien s lifelong proje

  • Title: J.R.R. Tolkien's Lost English Mythology
  • Author: Simon J. Cook William Puck
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 156
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • A path breaking account of Tolkien s Middle earth as the lost world of ancient English mythology In this essay the award winning intellectual historian, Simon J Cook, explores Tolkien s lifelong project of reconstructing the ancient traditions of the North myths and legends once at the heart of English culture but forgotten after the Anglo Saxon settlement of the BritiA path breaking account of Tolkien s Middle earth as the lost world of ancient English mythology In this essay the award winning intellectual historian, Simon J Cook, explores Tolkien s lifelong project of reconstructing the ancient traditions of the North myths and legends once at the heart of English culture but forgotten after the Anglo Saxon settlement of the British Isles Cook situates The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings in relation to Edwardian scholarship on the prehistory of Northern Europe and the origin of the English nation Taking us through three key stages of his creative writing, Cook shows how Tolkien crafted stories that fit and illuminate our fragmentary knowledge of ancient English traditions By the end of his essay, Aragorn, Arwen, and Frodo appear in a new light no longer just icons of modern fantasy, but also the original heroes of a lost English mythology.

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    About "Simon J. Cook William Puck"

    1. Simon J. Cook William Puck

      I m an intellectual historian, writing on late Victorian and Edwardian scholarship.I was born in London, England, spent too many years at Cambridge, UK, and taught academic writing at Duke University, North Carolina.Today I m an independent scholar, creating intellectual content outside established academic institutions.I support my scholarly habit with my editing work and live, together with a growing family of children, guinea pigs and cats, in a small village in Israel situated just left of the end of the world.

    253 thoughts on “J.R.R. Tolkien's Lost English Mythology”

    1. Mr. Cook did a comparison and contrast of the studies and writings of scholars Chadwick and Tolkien. I found it interesting, but as I must admit.way over my head. I profess to know the books of the triolgy maybe better than many, having read them I think, six times. My first reading was in 1973 and lastly earlier this year. However, I must just take Mr. Cook's words in this essay as true and accurate.It seems commonly accepted that England has no mythology of its own and therefore has borrowed m [...]


    2. Review originally posted 20 November 2014 on Falling Letters.Back in the spring, Simon Cook published a short article, "On Tolkien Fundamentalism", at Tolkien Library. I enjoyed the article and posted a response, which Cook commented on. I was happy to engage in discussion, and so I was also happy accept an invitation to review his recently published essay, "J.R.R. Tolkien's Lost English Mythology". The essay explores "how The Lord of the Rings arose as a conjectural reconstruction of the lost m [...]


    3. This book surprised me. Often when I hear a new idea it comes through somewhat calloused hands, but Cook has written a thoroughly eloquent and rewarding argument that really got hold of my imagination. I've read a lot of Tolkien-based academic writing, but this is unique in my experience. I am strongly recommending it to my friends and looking forward to a new discussion opening up.As per the blurb, this book is concerned with Tolkien's interaction with England's lost mythology, which was famous [...]


    4. This was a scholarly and interesting essay exploring Tolkien's creation of an English mythology from the roots that already existed in the ancient traditions. Simon Cook explores the world that Tolkien emerged and grew in, and the legends, language and culture that Tolkien studied as an academic. My academic days are past so this review is hard to write - but I'll try.I first encountered Tolkien's writings when I was reading translations of Old English and Anglo-Saxon tales, notably 'Beowulf' in [...]


    5. I really enjoyed this, and gobbled it up while commuting today. My only complaint was that it's too short! I've long been fascinated by the sheer Englishness of Tolkien's stories - not just the bucolic countryside of The Shire, but elements such as the king's healing hands, and the sword that was broken and other echoes of Arthuriana. My understanding was that Tolkien was recreating a mythology that we'd lost in the mists of history. In this tome, Cook explains how that is so, and what sources T [...]


    6. In an imaginary world like Middle-Earth, which is 'at once so multifarious and so true to its own inner laws' (C.S. Lewis), nothing could be easier than for fans and scholars to find some parts of this world far more fascinating than others. Many, for example, devote long study to Tolkien's languages, which are of great importance for his world and are indeed fundamental to its very creation Others find questions of the adaptation of the books to film, and of the impact of the books on popular c [...]




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