Literacy with an Attitude: Educating Working-Class Children in Their Own Self-Interest

Literacy with an Attitude Educating Working Class Children in Their Own Self Interest This book is for teachers parents and community organizers who are on the side of working class children It s about the resistance of working class children to the kind of education they typically r

  • Title: Literacy with an Attitude: Educating Working-Class Children in Their Own Self-Interest
  • Author: Patrick J. Finn
  • ISBN: 9780791442869
  • Page: 151
  • Format: Paperback
  • This book is for teachers, parents, and community organizers who are on the side of working class children It s about the resistance of working class children to the kind of education they typically receive, education designed to make them useful workers and obedient citizens It s about working class habits of communication and ways of using language that interfere withThis book is for teachers, parents, and community organizers who are on the side of working class children It s about the resistance of working class children to the kind of education they typically receive, education designed to make them useful workers and obedient citizens It s about working class habits of communication and ways of using language that interfere with schooling It s about a new brand of teachers, followers of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire who are developing effective methods for teaching powerful literacy in American working class classrooms It s about teacher networks where teachers devoted to equity and justice find mutual support And it s about community organizers who are bringing working class parents together around education issues and helping them mount effective demands for powerful literacy for their children.

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      Published :2019-05-16T08:52:13+00:00

    About "Patrick J. Finn"

    1. Patrick J. Finn

      Patrick J. Finn Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Literacy with an Attitude: Educating Working-Class Children in Their Own Self-Interest book, this is one of the most wanted Patrick J. Finn author readers around the world.

    221 thoughts on “Literacy with an Attitude: Educating Working-Class Children in Their Own Self-Interest”

    1. Educators, just read it--and grasp the author's understanding of what it takes for students caught in poverty to become real learners. I'm sure you'll find things you disagree with, but consider how the author's experiences may have differed from yours and why you've drawn different conclusions. And, read all the way to the end of the second edition where he chronicles what happened when he put his ideas into action.


    2. Finns offers and social and idealogical commentary that can inform teaching practice. You will learn little about the practical business of teaching by reading this book, but this book will help you understand the problems of public education in a way that will orient you towards possible solution, at least within your own classroom. At the same time, you may just rediscover the reason your standing in front of that class in the first place."Literacy With an Attitude" belongs on every leftist ed [...]


    3. Literacy with an Attitude is a well rounded look at the ways in which society, and its imperceptible fingertips come to influence the way that our schools operate, and thus how our children learn. As a beginning teacher who will be serving primarily working-class children, I thought this book gives great takeaways for people who are somehow connected to the world of schools. The things to learn in this book are both tangible - what to teach- and more ephemeral - how to go about thinking how and [...]


    4. This helped me understand how important student choice and voice are. The book will help teachers and parents understand how activities such as debate and socratic seminars are useful and empowering. We can teach our children to use their voices in a productive, meaningful way.


    5. What prejudices, preconceptions, policies, and other forces are keeping the rich rich, and the poor even poorer? According to Patrick J. Finn, it all comes down to traditional American education. In this fascinating and subversive little book, Finn outlines the mechanisms and mechanizations that suppress and undermine the voices of working-class children and communities, and at the same time support, validate, and empower the children of affluent communities. It makes so much sense. To ground hi [...]


    6. Fascinating book. Classrooms of lower, middle, and upper class are taught differently. Basically, if your parents are factory workers, you are also taught to be a factory worker. If your parents are CEOs, you are taught to be a CEO. Working class kids are taught by authoritarian, strict rules. They are to follow directions, copy from the board and memorize for the test. They are required to master the basics of reading and writing before they are allowed to express themselves in the content of t [...]


    7. I had high hopes for this book and for the most part, my expectations were met. I wanted to recharge my batteries and get ideas for charging up the students I serve in my school.Reading the reviews here make me wish I'd gotten the second edition since it seems that edition has additional chapters that give some practical suggestions for putting some of the ideas into practice.I had some issues with the tone of the work - the writer's voice was often overly casual or self-consciously "cool" and s [...]


    8. I use this book in an English Education course that I teach, and it is an especially powerful way for students to understand how principles of social justice can be enacted through literacy and language education.Finn—an articulate and unapologetic advocate of liberal politics and economic, social, and educational equity—supports his arguments and analyses with abundant scholarship as well as his own personal experiences as an educator. He clearly shows how domesticating education perpetuate [...]


    9. Alright, it's time to finally call this one as DNF. This book has a lot going for it and I hope to finish it someday, but today is not that day. I just can't get motivated to do so because the moment has long passed since I was studying this topic. However, I'm grateful for the insights I've gained from reading half of this book. Finn focuses on the idea that we shouldn't educate working class students to be LIKE upper class people. We should educate them to be able to be however they want to be [...]


    10. Fascinating study for teachers about the need to encourage our children to be active learners, thinkers instead of passive, obedient learners. Several different case studies of progressive and traditional schools are included, and these are rather enlightening. I was surprised, too, to read about how the way we speak to children when they are very young can shape their attitude toward learning. After reading it, I had some very interesting conversations with my students about authority and power [...]


    11. For those that have only ready the first edition. I highly recommend reading the 8 chapters Finn added to the second edition. While I read the first part of the book frustrated by the "savage inequalities," I also felt helpless in the face of such challenges. The end of the book however, Finn chronicles many grassroots efforts to take on the inequity and challenge the status quo. Now I have an idea for a dissertation.


    12. I thought this was an extensive revision to an already amazing text!So thought-provoking about how schools are run, how teachers teach, and how we can infuse our classrooms with a theme of social justice. LOVE this book - every teacher should read this at least once will transform the way you look at your classroom & the world.


    13. Yes, terrible cover and title -- but it did make me think about teaching and literacy education in ways I hadn't before. I wish there was more discussion of classroom strategies that teachers can use to teach literacy "with an attitude," but there are tons of suggestions for further reading, both in the book and in online reviews. Very interesting book.


    14. A pivotal book in my understanding of what it means to be in the position of "educator". Moreover, one of the essential pieces in helping me to understand my worldview openly and honestly. In part, my this book helped me to discover my true "voice" as a teacher, and most importantly, how to allow other voices to have power.


    15. This is a workmanlike summary of the way that social class is reproduced by way of public schooling, and is fine as it goes. Mr. Finn cites Paulo Freire at length, and I think it might be difficult to make sense of this book without having read Freire.


    16. The cover and title are off-putting, but of all the books I had to read while I was teaching in the Bronx, this was one of the select few that actually could have been useful. Too bad then that I was a math teacher.


    17. A highlight of the fall required reading in my grad program. Into socio-economically determinism in schools? Wonder about "oppositional identity?" Then check it out.



    18. This book seriously changed the way I think about my work in education. Highly recommended to anyone who works with or in working class communities.



    19. If you can get passed the toolish-looking child on the cover, Finn reports on studies & Freirean pedagogy ina useful way. Not much in the way of putting his insights into practice, however.


    20. Very interesting book. Made a difference in how I consider language, especially language of the home. There is not a "natural" way to come into contact with literacy.


    21. It was eye-opening in the way that I teach and how students are taught in general. Some of it may be a little out there, but I enjoyed how it challenged me.




    22. Yup, Finn's right, working class and working poor children resist instruction in a way that upper and middle class students do not.


    23. So far this book provides a great background for teachers who are working with working class students. I am enjoying this book very much.



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