Amores = Liefdesgedichten

Amores Liefdesgedichten Ovidius de meester van de metamorfosen debuteerde als dichter van liefdespo zie Hij verwierf zich op dat gebied in Rome een grote naam Liefde is verlangen en verleiden Maar ook ruzie ontrouw loere

  • Title: Amores = Liefdesgedichten
  • Author: Ovid M. d'Hane-Scheltema
  • ISBN: 9789025304942
  • Page: 347
  • Format: Paperback
  • Ovidius, de meester van de metamorfosen, debuteerde als dichter van liefdespo zie Hij verwierf zich op dat gebied in Rome een grote naam Liefde is verlangen en verleiden Maar ook ruzie, ontrouw, loerende echtgenoten en stugge deurbewakers In Ovidius liefdesgedichten passeert een breed scala aan onderwerpen de revue De variatie in toon is uniek Angstige en boze gedicOvidius, de meester van de metamorfosen, debuteerde als dichter van liefdespo zie Hij verwierf zich op dat gebied in Rome een grote naam Liefde is verlangen en verleiden Maar ook ruzie, ontrouw, loerende echtgenoten en stugge deurbewakers In Ovidius liefdesgedichten passeert een breed scala aan onderwerpen de revue De variatie in toon is uniek Angstige en boze gedichten, over ziekte, impotentie of abortus, worden afgewisseld met idyllische momenten en tragikomische sc nes zoals die waarin Corinna haar pas geverfde haar verliest.De ik figuur in Ovidius gedichten is geen slachtoffer van zijn passie liefde is vooral een spel Daarover schrijft Ovidius met ironie en lichtvoetigheid, maar ook met ernst, ontroering, bezorgdheid en medeleven Alles wordt van twee kanten bekeken, stelt vertaalster Marietje d Hane Scheltema, en er wordt sympathie gewekt voor wat goed n fout is Publius Ovidius Naso 43 v.Chr 17 n.Chr behoort tot de grootste Romeinse dichters Zijn werk staat bekend om zijn speelse en vernieuwende karakter.Marietje d Hane Scheltema is bekend en geprezen als vertaalster van Ovidius Metamorphosen 70000 exemplaren verkocht en Lessen in liefde Als eerbetoon aan de onsterfelijke dichter schreef zij vorig jaar Alles altijd anders, over Ovidius.

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      Published :2019-07-20T01:32:19+00:00

    About "Ovid M. d'Hane-Scheltema"

    1. Ovid M. d'Hane-Scheltema

      Publius Ovidius Naso 20 March 43 BCE CE 17 18 , known as Ovid v d in the English speaking world, was a Roman poet best known for the Metamorphoses, a 15 book continuous mythological narrative written in the meter of epic, and for collections of love poetry in elegiac couplets, especially the As Love Affairs and Ars Amatoria Art of Love His poetry was much imitated during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, and greatly influenced Western art and literature The Metamorphoses remains one of the most important sources of classical mythology.Ovid is traditionally ranked alongside Virgil and Horace, his older contemporaries, as one of the three canonic poets of Latin literature He was the first major Roman poet to begin his career during the reign of Augustus, and the Imperial scholar Quintilian considered him the last of the Latin love elegists He enjoyed enormous popularity, but in one of the mysteries of literary history he was sent by Augustus into exile in a remote province on the Black Sea, where he remained until his death Ovid himself attributes his exile to carmen et error, a poem and a mistake , but his discretion in discussing the causes has resulted in much speculation among scholars.Ovid s prolific poetry includes the Heroides, a collection of verse epistles written as by mythological heroines to the lovers who abandoned them the Fasti, an incomplete six book exploration of Roman religion with a calendar structure and the Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto, two collections of elegies in the form of complaining letters from his exile His shorter works include the Remedia Amoris Cure for Love , the curse poem Ibis, and an advice poem on women s cosmetics He wrote a lost tragedy, Medea, and mentions that some of his other works were adapted for staged performance.

    732 thoughts on “Amores = Liefdesgedichten”

    1. Oh Ovid, how silly you are! I thoroughly enjoyed translating Amores I (Amores I includes the first diptych in Latin poetry, if you're interested). The only thing I did not like about this book was the editory, Barsby. He was quite insufferable. But, if you will just ignore the commentary on the right-hand pages, then you'll be able to enjoy this without any problems. That is, if you know Latin. Although I suppose you could just read the English translation at the bottom of the page. :)


    2. Not an outstanding piece but it is really interesting to see young Ovid doing essentialy free style since in this book poems have no connection other then basic theme. So it's colourful spectre of love-related poems, sometimes even contradicting each other, sometimes deep and romantic, sometimes not-deep and romantic, sometimes errotic, sometimes alegoricalI really enjoyed reading it but at the end it seemed quite too long.


    3. Estos cortos poemas o elegías de amor, son una especie de diario personal en el cual el autor explora todas las posibilidades de un enamorado en pleno disfrute de su pasión.Está el enamoramiento, la conquista, la pasión, los celos, los engaños, la rabia y todos los estados por los que pasa el amante en una relación, que parece más tóxica que otra cosa.La narración es muy sincera y con varias referencias a la mitología e historias de su cultura romana.


    4. I usually dislike the overly dramatic love poems but Ovid has an extraordinary way to capture, at least, my attention.Favorite poems for reference:I.4I.5I.11I.12I.13I.15II.4II.7 II.8 II.14II.18III.1III.7III.12III.14


    5. 'There's an old wood untouched for many years:you'd believe a god lives in the place.There's a sacred spring at its centre and a caveof overhanging rock, and birds sing sweetly all around.While I was walking there privately in the wooded shade –wondering what project my Muse might be engendering —Elegy arrived, her perfumed hair in a knot,and with one foot, I think, shorter than the other.Her form was lovely, her dress refined, her looks loving,and even the defect of her foot was a source of [...]


    6. I borrowed this book from one of my friends and when she loaned me her copy she told me that it's a more lusty and explicit translation than the newer copies. After reading this book all I can say is I can't believe I didn't read it sooner. Not only is it a great read, it acts as a double-edged sword guide to either seduce someone already in a relationship (or to a lesser extent cheat on your lover), or to realize what not to do when you first fall in love. The translation was earthy and passio [...]


    7. (…) Yet once I was ever in fear of the night and its empty phantoms; I marvelled at whosoever would venture abroad in darkness. Cupid laughed in my ear, with his tender mother, too, and lightly said: "You, too, shall become valiant!" And without delay came love—no shades that flit by night, no arms raised up to deal my doom, do I fear now. You alone I fear, too unyielding to my wish; on you alone I fawn; it is you who hold the thunderbolt that can ruin me. (I. vi, 9.)** trad. G. Showerman (1 [...]


    8. Ovid is overrated.Ovid's Poetry: 3 stars. Propertius is way better. Skill in verse and playfulness in ideas do not a good poet make: Ovid's inability to be serious -- ever -- marks him down in my book. Give me the bathos of Catullus or the sharp, distilled emotion of Propertius over this tripe. (Not gonna lie, though -- 1.5 is pretty sweet.)Barsby's Commentary: 3 stars. The commentary itself is quite excellent, but putting the translation right below the text was annoying and led to much slothfu [...]


    9. Fuckboy fuckboy, whatcha' gonna do. Me encanta Ovidio, quizás más que Virgilio. Es muy natural hablando del amor, no es todo un drama como Catulo o Propercio y eso que es conocedor de la literatura griega. Saca los temás más geniales como los gatillazos o las siestas, y saca su lado más elegiaco cuando se lamenta de que se aburre con su amada, del aborto, de x y de y.



    10. I just loved his witty translation - he brought Ovid's stunning poetry to life again. Who could say Latin is dead? This poetry is as relevant and home-hitting as ever.


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