The Donut: A Canadian History

The Donut A Canadian History In Canada the donut is often thought of as the unofficial national food Donuts are sold at every intersection and rest stop celebrated in song and story as symbols of Canadian identity and one chai

  • Title: The Donut: A Canadian History
  • Author: Steve Penfold
  • ISBN: 9780802095459
  • Page: 235
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Canada, the donut is often thought of as the unofficial national food Donuts are sold at every intersection and rest stop, celebrated in song and story as symbols of Canadian identity, and one chain in particular, Tim Horton s, has become a veritable icon with over 2500 shops across the country But there is to the donut than these and other expressions of snackfIn Canada, the donut is often thought of as the unofficial national food Donuts are sold at every intersection and rest stop, celebrated in song and story as symbols of Canadian identity, and one chain in particular, Tim Horton s, has become a veritable icon with over 2500 shops across the country But there is to the donut than these and other expressions of snackfood patriotism would suggest In this study, Steve Penfold puts the humble donut in its historical context, examining how one deep fried confectionary became, not only a mass commodity, but an edible symbol of Canadianness.Penfold examines the history of the donut in light of broader social, economic, and cultural issues, and uses the donut as a window onto key developments in twentieth century Canada such as the growth of a consumer society, the relationship between big business and community, and the ironic qualities of Canadian national identity He goes on to explore the social and political conditions that facilitated the rapid rise and steady growth of donut shops across the country.Based on a wide range of sources, from commercial and government reports to personal interviews, The Donut is a comprehensive and fascinating look at one of Canada s most popular products It offers original insights on consumer culture, mass consumption, and the dynamics of Canadian history.

    • Best Read [Steve Penfold] Á The Donut: A Canadian History || [Spirituality Book] PDF ☆
      235 Steve Penfold
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      Published :2019-08-03T01:56:39+00:00

    About "Steve Penfold"

    1. Steve Penfold

      Steve Penfold Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Donut: A Canadian History book, this is one of the most wanted Steve Penfold author readers around the world.

    994 thoughts on “The Donut: A Canadian History”

    1. Clearly an academic work written by a history prof, derived from his PhD thesis, this book gave me much nerdy pleasure in learning more about such fascinating topics as: North American food culture; Canadian identity; local history, particularly changes in Southern Ontario in the last half of the 20th century, with focus on Hamilton (perhaps not Canada’s donut shop capital? and actually not the location of the first Tim Hortons?); the rapid onset of suburbs and strip malls, consumerism and the [...]


    2. I wanted a little more donut history here, and a little less late 20th century Canadian economic history. Not that all of the donut shop/post-war economic change/donut popularity explosion stuff is that boring, but some of the analysis here could really be applied to all chain restaurants. All the talk about expanding car culture and locating donut shops at major intersections and approaches to citiest incredibly thrilling, and basically the same for burger joints and pizza places and taco stand [...]


    3. I'm not entirely sure when I'll get to finish this, which is too bad, since I think the last chapters hold the most promise. (They look to me more in the way of cultural history than economic and social history.) Certainly, the premise of the book is a good one, and Penfold can be an extremely amusing writer. Neither argument nor humor is coming through quite as well as I'd like it to in what I've read so far, though. (posted 14 March 2011)


    4. I heard this author speak and found him funny and interesting and was looking forward to reading the book. Unfortunately (although predictably, as this is, in the end, an academic book) the book didn't have the same level of humour and personality as his public appearance. I am not one to judge academic texts -- I have no standard by which to measure his research or analysis. But at the end of the day, it's just a little too dry for my leisure reading.


    5. I agree with my father about this book: A look at how the history of the donut in Canada is an example of the post-war drive-thru culture, and an explanation of how the donut became a Canadian cultural symbol. Gives some thought-provoking ideas, loses some interest because the writing gets too focused on details, and definitely makes you crave donuts while reading.



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