The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed

The Rap Year Book The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since Discussed Debated and Deconstructed The Rap Year Book takes readers on a journey that begins in widely regarded as the moment rap became recognized as part of the cultural and musical landscape and comes right up to the present S

  • Title: The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed
  • Author: Shea Serrano Arturo Torres Ice-T
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 376
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Rap Year Book takes readers on a journey that begins in 1979, widely regarded as the moment rap became recognized as part of the cultural and musical landscape, and comes right up to the present Shea Serrano deftly pays homage to the most important song of each year Serrano also examines the most important moments that surround the history and culture of rap music frThe Rap Year Book takes readers on a journey that begins in 1979, widely regarded as the moment rap became recognized as part of the cultural and musical landscape, and comes right up to the present Shea Serrano deftly pays homage to the most important song of each year Serrano also examines the most important moments that surround the history and culture of rap music from artists backgrounds to issues of race, the rise of hip hop, and the struggles among its major players both personal and professional Covering East Coast and West Coast, famous rapper feuds, chart toppers, and show stoppers, The Rap Year Book is an in depth look at the most influential genre of music to come out of the last generation Complete with infographics, lyric maps, hilarious and informative footnotes, portraits of the artists, and short essays by other prominent music writers, The Rap Year Book is both a narrative and illustrated guide to the most iconic and influential rap songs ever created.

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      Posted by:Shea Serrano Arturo Torres Ice-T
      Published :2019-08-02T04:08:59+00:00

    About "Shea Serrano Arturo Torres Ice-T"

    1. Shea Serrano Arturo Torres Ice-T

      Shea Serrano Arturo Torres Ice-T Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed book, this is one of the most wanted Shea Serrano Arturo Torres Ice-T author readers around the world.

    181 thoughts on “The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed”


    1. I've always been confused that there's not a greater crossover between my literary friends and my hip-hop friends. Both rely on a love of language, the way words can twist and stretch and hit, and both are about storytelling, about immersion and experience and emotion. Also: puns. And I have longed for the day where a writer talented enough to bridge those worlds could write the book that explains the joyful mischief and soulful depths of great hip hop to an audience that hasn't got it yet.Shea [...]


    2. This book raised as many questions as it taught me things, but in a good way. Now that I know which song was most important every year since hip-hop became a music genre in collective consciousness, I want to know: who were its most important artists? There are none nominated more than two times, but West-Coast hip-hop had an eleven years run where it was at the forefront of the genre's innovation, so what does that mean? Is Dr. Dre the most important rapper of all-time, at least statistically. [...]



    3. Like all good music writing, it is very funny, overflowing with love for rap music, history, and culture, and imbued with a healthy and sensible fear of and love for DMX.


    4. The Rap Year Book by Shea Serrano was, as an authoritative read on the history of rap, a decent read until 1998, until it completely fizzles out of control when Serrano starts to require forming his own opinion.Major themes, and driving forces were unforgivably omitted - notably the role of the female rapper as an antithesis to the flamboyance and brutality of gangster rap (see- The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill), picking Lifestyle (?!) as best song over Kendrick Lamar's ode to breaking free from [...]


    5. Quintessential example of why I wish had a 3.5 star rating. Excellent primer to hip-hop for the casual fan, introduces the reader to most of the major players and narratives in the genre's history which tends to seem more like the world presented in comic books or action movies than real life. Serrano's writing is specific and sporadic in the best ways, jumping around between objective history, personal opinion and a smattering of other details from his subjects' lives and his own. The prose is [...]


    6. So informative and thorough and engaging and funny. If you’re at all a fan of rap, and if you know a lot about its history and evolution or if you don’t know anything about its history and evolution, READ THIS BOOK. I learned a lot and Shea Serrano had me cracking up on the regular.


    7. Ugg, I was gifted this over Christmas by a buddy who already had a copy. (He wrote one of the rebuttals.) It's an interesting book in theory (picking the best rap song by year since 1979) and one I should've loved considering how often I reference EgoTrip's list of greatest rap singles found in their Book of Rap Lists. Unfortunately it falls apart in execution.It loses points right off the bat for having "Style Maps." Basically clip art used by Serrano to pad out the length of his book. Is readi [...]


    8. I loved this so much. I've always been a fan of the Grantland style: definitively ranking subjective things in such specific ways. So detailed, so funny. I laughed out loud and also cried at one point (during the chapter about "Same Love"). Bummed that the only woman really highlighted was Nicki (her verse on "Monster" IS iconic), like where's Kim? Queen Latifah? Salt 'n Pepa? MISSY?! But again, subjective. Super fun read. Highly recommended.



    9. One of the best pieces of pop culture writing from one of the best pop culture writers currently working. Shea's work is like creative fuel because it makes you want to be better, funnier, wittier, smarter, more insightful. This was a gorgeous combination of hip hop history lessons and deeeeep fangirl/boy rantings, which is precisely what I would want a Rap Year Book to be. Also, the illustrations and charts are GORGEOUS. Would kill for a few wall-sized posters of these.


    10. As the title says, not necessarily the best song from each year but the most important--what song changed the game, made a statement, or announced a major new voice. Overall, real solid choices and excellent perspective on the evolution and lasting impact of the genre. Okay, here's one I would have picked differently: 1995 ("Shook Ones Pt. II" over "Dear Mama").


    11. While it was a great read, it wasn't exactly what I was expecting. Ended up being more of a history of Rap rather than a discussion/debate on why certain songs were picked over others as the most influential song of each year. Would have appreciated a list of which songs were in consideration for each individual year.


    12. SPIN: Do you consider yourselves prophets?CHUCK D: I guess so. We're bringing a message that's the same shit that all the other guys that I mentioned in the song have either been killed or deported: Marcus Garvey, Nat Turner, all the way up to Farrakhan and Malcolm X.What is a prophet? One that comes with a message from God to try to free people. My people are enslaved within their own minds.Rap serves as the communication that they don't get for themselves to make them feel good about themselve [...]


    13. so rap, especially the 1994-2002 (or so) incarnations of it, is pretty dear to my heart. I defend Kanye to anyone who will listen, I went to the On the Run tour for the Jay Z half of the bill, I get in fights with my students (who weren't alive at the time) about West Coast 90s rap. I'm no expert, but I do love it. & then Shea Serrano, my fave Grantland writer/Twitter genius, went and wrote "The Rap Yearbook," which dissects the most important rap song each year going back to 1979. I downed [...]


    14. Ma lugesin seda nagu iga muud populaarteaduslikku raamatut alast, millest ma liiga palju ei tea, aga midagi ikka, vaatasin juutuubist videosid ja harisin ennast ja no nii huvitav oli ja pildid on ilusad ja yks kord ajas kõva häälega naerma ka. Lisaks uutele lemmikutele (Slick Rick, A Tribe Called Quest, Lil Wayne, DMX, Kendrick), mis nyyd muudkui kummitavad, on huvitav ka see, et pärast edasi kinkimist tahaks ma sealt ikkagi kogu aeg asju yle vaadata - yhesõnaga väga hea teatmeteos.


    15. The conversational tone of this book and absolutely gorgeous illustrations really put it over the top for me. It is a deliberately highly subjective text, and that is the only reason I will forgive Killer Mike's "Reagan," which is iconic and transcendent, being passed over for Macklemore's "Same Love," which is not. I'm delighted to own this book, and TRYB is a warm, enthusiastic read for even casual fans of the genre like myself.




    16. Smart and well-researched and informative and funny. Gave me a deeper appreciation for the genre at large, as well as for several individuals and their music. Long, but never boring. Shea rocks


    17. We don't have any other writer like Shea Serrano. A former middle-school teacher who took up freelance writing when his wife became pregnant with their third child, he's pretty much just a joyful goofball who covered pop culture (particularly rap and action movies) and basketball at the late, great Grantland. I visit his Twitter feed at least once a week, if only because its easy charm and hilarity and warmth are a welcome antidote to the soul-numbing humorlessness of grad school (and most of th [...]


    18. The Rap Year Book takes the reader on a journey through the history of rap from its start in the music industry all the way up until present day. The book evaluates a song each for each year from 1979 to 2014. Through evaluating the songs, the book presents to the reader how rap evolved, and how a song would impact the future of rap.Overall, as a rap fan, I found it really intriguing to read and learn about the classic and modern songs I know and (mostly) love. The book does a good job of windin [...]


    19. I saw this book posted on some site a few months ago and was immediately intrigued. I sent it to a few friends of mine, saying we should probably check this book out. A few months later a friend asked me to return a book for her at one of the Brooklyn Public Libraries and low and behold it was The Rap Year Book. I immediately checked it out myself after I returned it of course. Didn't want my homegirl to get any fees.The writing is witty, intelligent and very conversational. It almost feels like [...]


    20. I read this book under the suggestion of Lin Manuel Miranda, and he did not lead me astray. I am not the biggest rap fan (as in I had to youtube a few of the earlier songs listed), but I know enough about the genre to be interested in this bit of history from the get go. But even if you have NO interest in rap, Shea Serrano's style is so entertaining and laugh out loud funny, I would easily recommend this book to anyone. ANYONE I tell you (okybe not like my mom and dad? But kind of like Hamilton [...]


    21. Vacation Book #2I was immediately struck by the author's younger age and perspective on the history of "best rap songs" per annum. There's a fair amount of the author's personal anecdotes in the experience of why certain songs were relevant to himself and the wider world. I liked the personal aspects, but they also showed his age, and highlighted our different eras of engagement with hip-hop. Serrano clearly is down, has a passion for the craft and consequence of hip-hop, so I have no beef or cr [...]


    22. An incredible indispensable history of rap told through the most important songs of every year according to Shea Serrano. While I don't agree with every choice (there is absolutely no way Biggie's "Juicy" is more important than Nas' "NY State of Mind"), Serrano's analysis of every song is amazing and usually hilarious. I am, however, disappointed that no female rappers made the cut (with the sole exception of Nicki Minaj on Kanye's "Monster"). No Missy Elliot, no MC Lyte, no Salt 'n' Pepa? Come [...]


    23. It's 1987. Ive just traded my "Invisible Touch" tape for a copied cassette of Run DMCs "Raising Hell". I'm transformed. From then until the mid-90s I was all things rap music, whether Dr. Dre and Ed Lover were bringing it to me or if I was listening to Too Short and DJ Quick off the black market. God help me, but I can still recite NWAs album from memory. Of all the genres I love from my youth, rap is the only one that brings me distilled joy upon hearing. Shea Serrano's book will please any mus [...]


    24. Wonderful. If you ever liked rap at any point in your life, you will enjoy this deep dive into some of the greatest songs of the last 35 years. I had to stop many times and play the song discussed so I could get some of the references. The lyrics, performers, record label- everything that went into recording the selection for any given year is up for discussion. I can't wait to see what Shea decides to write next.


    25. Only not giving it 5 because I don't think Rick Ross nor Young Thug deserve a spot and I don't think the arguments for them are strong. Other than that, really good timeline of rap music and a list of easy to spot influences.


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