How to Study History

How to Study History We have set down in this book the basic rules and principles of historical study that a student should bear in mind as he enters upon his first college history course In our experience as college teac

  • Title: How to Study History
  • Author: Norman F. Cantor Richard I. Schneider
  • ISBN: 9780882957098
  • Page: 348
  • Format: Paperback
  • We have set down in this book the basic rules and principles of historical study that a student should bear in mind as he enters upon his first college history course In our experience as college teachers of history, we have found that students need to be informed on the nature and methods of history as a distinct intellectual discipline, and we have tried to communicateWe have set down in this book the basic rules and principles of historical study that a student should bear in mind as he enters upon his first college history course In our experience as college teachers of history, we have found that students need to be informed on the nature and methods of history as a distinct intellectual discipline, and we have tried to communicate this information in as direct and practical a way as possible.We have no only set before the college student the standards of excellence one should strive to attain in historical study we have attempted to show, step by step, how to reach these goals We have presented the methods and principles that appear to have the widest consensus among academic historians, and we have sought to avoid extreme and idiosyncratic opinions.

    • Ô How to Study History || ↠ PDF Download by ↠ Norman F. Cantor Richard I. Schneider
      348 Norman F. Cantor Richard I. Schneider
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      Posted by:Norman F. Cantor Richard I. Schneider
      Published :2019-04-21T00:31:09+00:00

    About "Norman F. Cantor Richard I. Schneider"

    1. Norman F. Cantor Richard I. Schneider

      Born in Winnipeg, Canada, Cantor received his B.A at the University of Manitoba in 1951 He went on to get his master s degree in 1953 from Princeton University and spent a year as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford He received his doctorate from Princeton in 1957 under the direction of the eminent medievalist Joseph R Strayer.After teaching at Princeton, Cantor moved to Columbia University from 1960 to 1966 He was a Leff professor at Brandeis University until 1970 and then was at SUNY Binghamton until 1976, when he took a position at University of Illinois at Chicago for two years He then went on to New York University, where he was professor of history, sociology and comparative literature After a brief stint as Fulbright Professor at the Tel Aviv University History Department 1987 88 , he devoted himself to working as a full time writer.Although his early work focused on English religious and intellectual history, Cantor s later scholarly interests were far diverse, and he found success writing for a popular audience than he did engaging in narrowly focused original research He did publish one monograph study, based on his graduate thesis, Church, kingship, and lay investiture in England, 1089 1135, which appeared in 1958 and remains an important contribution to the topic of church state relations in medieval England Throughout his career, however, Cantor preferred to write on the broad contours of Western history, and on the history of academic medieval studies in Europe and North America, in particular the lives and careers of eminent medievalists His books generally received mixed reviews in academic journals, but were often popular bestsellers, buoyed by Cantor s fluid, often colloquial, writing style and his lively critiques of persons and ideas, both past and present Cantor was intellectually conservative and expressed deep skepticism about what he saw as methodological fads, particularly Marxism and postmodernism, but also argued for greater inclusion of women and minorities in traditional historical narratives In both his best selling Inventing the Middle Ages and his autobiography, Inventing Norman Cantor, he reflected on his strained relationship over the years with other historians and with academia in general.Upon retirement in 1999, Cantor moved to Miami, Florida, where he continued to work on several books up to the time of his death.

    206 thoughts on “How to Study History”

    1. Not quite a 5 star, but definitely 4 1/2, so I rounded up. Written 40 years ago yet still just as popular, a true sign that a book hits upon principles reflective of true study and not just contemporary social opinion. Definitely worth an afternoon read to help one understand why history is important, but then to also help them develop skills to understand how to interpret that history most objectively while applying those same skills to modern day events to help you understand history in the ma [...]


    2. An excellent practical and philosophical guide to becoming a principled student of primary and secondary sources of history. He clearly outlines and describes different schools of thought. Cantor seems to view the historian's task not as determining right or wrong in history, but as recognizing historical significance and developing traits of accuracy, fairness, self-criticism, and openness. A little weak on truth, but he's speaking in the secular academic context.


    3. This was required in my history course, and I'm glad it was the book they chose. A good rundown on being a scholar of history, and despite its age and occasionally archaic methods of being a successful student, a lot can be figured out from this volume without having to worry about when it was written.


    4. Its information is good, but sometimes I had to laugh at loud at how fanatic the writers sounded. They would advise the students to spend all extra time in the library, cataloging books on their favorite subjects, and to hang outlines of their research papers by their mirrors where they would see them always. Otherwise, there was some very sound advise and good information in the book.


    5. Though it is quite dated, if you ignore the stuff about index cards and what not-- there is some really helpful advice in here.


    6. A little dated, but still very useful. History students of all kinds can benefit from this, but I'd say it's a must-read for grad students.


    7. This was a required text in graduate school I read it, and forgot it. It is now on my reread list.


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