The Anglo-Saxons

The Anglo Saxons This survey an introduction to the history of Anglo Saxon England looks at political history and religious cultural social legal and economic themes are woven in Throughout the book the authors m

  • Title: The Anglo-Saxons
  • Author: James Campbell Eric John Patrick Wormald
  • ISBN: 9780140143959
  • Page: 187
  • Format: Paperback
  • This survey, an introduction to the history of Anglo Saxon England looks at political history, and religious, cultural, social, legal and economic themes are woven in Throughout the book the authors make use of original sources such as chronicles, charters, manuscripts and coins, works of art, archaelogical remains and surviving buildings.The nature of power and kingship,This survey, an introduction to the history of Anglo Saxon England looks at political history, and religious, cultural, social, legal and economic themes are woven in Throughout the book the authors make use of original sources such as chronicles, charters, manuscripts and coins, works of art, archaelogical remains and surviving buildings.The nature of power and kingship, role of wealth, rewards, conquest and blood feud in the perennial struggle for power, structure of society, the development of Christianity and the relations between church and secular authority are discussed at length, while particular topics are explored in 19 picture essays.

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      Published :2019-01-08T14:40:11+00:00

    About "James Campbell Eric John Patrick Wormald"

    1. James Campbell Eric John Patrick Wormald

      Prof James Campbell MA, Hon DLitt, FBA, FSA was Tutorial Fellow and Professor of Medieval History at Worcester College, Oxford He has published extensively on the medieval period and on Anglo Saxon studies.He celebrated his 80th birthday in 2015.

    747 thoughts on “The Anglo-Saxons”

    1. Out of some sort of stupid snobbery (it's a coffee table book and full of glossy pictures, must be rubbish, I'll stick with Stenton) I've avoided this book like the plague. On finding a cheap hardcover edition in a secondhand bookshop, I decided that I'd give it a try.The main text of the book is written by James Campbell, Patrick Wormald and Eric John, each supplying chapters on their particular field of expertise. These chapters trace the history of the English from the collapse of the Roman E [...]


    2. Excellent introduction to the Anglo-Saxons. Well illustrated with essays from a variety of scholars. A book you can dip in and out of or read from cover to cover.Although this was a large format book somehow I managed to loose it. One day it was a sitting there, apparently happily, on the shelf. Next thing I know, it was gone.Absence truly makes the heart grow fonder, and so it may well be that this book has grown better in my imagination since loosing it than it actually was when I was reading [...]


    3. Very mildly amusing, probably only to me: I read this book with a different cover, but also at least two distinct books with this cover image. I suppose there are only so many dramatic early medieval artifacts to choose from


    4. I read this book when I was studying for prelims (a while back, shall we say). I switched to Anglo-Saxon studies from Middle English studies shortly before I finished coursework, so I had quite a bit of catch-up to do. This book accomplished that and gave me a solid framework to take to the more detailed works like Stenton's Anglo-Saxon England. It also has beautiful plates that I've used nearly every semester since I've started teaching.


    5. If you're interested in the Anglo-Saxons but don't know where to start, pick up this book. Written by the top Anglo-Saxonists working today, this well-illustrated volume will give a great overview of the culture and point you toward additional resources, if you just can't get enough.


    6. Summary:Three historians have compiled an in-depth chronicle of the Anglo-Saxon era. James Campbell, Patrick Wormald, and Eric John began with the Roman rule in Britain, and ended with the Battle of Hastings. Specific studies of Christianity, German settlers, reigns of kings, manuscripts, Vikings, warfare, and key battles are all explored. The Anglo-Saxons is a large glossy paperback. A must-have for all readers of British history, especially those keen on the Anglo-Saxon era. My Thoughts:I love [...]


    7. I’ve been reading lots of books on Anglo Saxon history as part of some research I’m doing, and so far this is definitely the best. It’s a very accessible and comprehensive book, written by numerous authors, that covers pretty much everything you need to know about Britain circa 449 AD to 1066. It tells of the battles, of the kings, the tribes and the alliances, right from the early days when our post-Roman country was subject to Germanic invaders, through warring kings, the coming of the V [...]


    8. A required read for my Anglo-Saxon course at University. This text is prepared almost perfectly and has become my companion on many quiet evenings. A great addition to anyone with an interest in ancient British history.


    9. It was useful and I will return to it many times for reference no doubt. At a different level, the actual size of the book didn't encourage me to read it - didn't fit in my bag!!! On the other hand, some books don't lend themselves to a smaller format, so can't really complain. Would have been nice to have more of the maps in colour, but not in terms of cost.


    10. Really great summary and description of the Anglo-Saxon period in England. However, I didn't care much for the writing style or organization, which made it hard to fully enjoy.



    11. An excellent overview of the history of the Anglo-Saxons, from the slow ebbing of Roman power in the early 5th century, until the traumatic and sudden end of Anglo-Saxon England on a hill near Hastings on 14th October 1066. Most of the scholarly conclusions hold up, despite the fact it is getting on a bit. Would recommend to someone who thinks they know it all (that was me!) right through to those who have barely heard of the Anglo-Saxons.


    12. Far too dry. Hard to see where this book was aimed as it doesn't seem to hit any target. Nevertheless it is worthwhile


    13. Save for the fact that I find the Anglo-Saxons to be dreadfully boring, this book was a very good read. It was well-written and clear, it held tons of information, and it had interesting photos on every page that really helped illustrate what life was like for the Anglo-Saxons. I recommend this book over the other well-respected text in this subject, Peter Hunter Blair's "An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon England".


    14. Great overview, and the photos and illustrations really help, both by giving examples of the archaeological evidence on which the writers are basing their conclusions, and also to give the reader an idea of what life in Anglo-Saxon England might have looked like.I read this before diving in to Sir Frank Stenton's magnum opus "Anglo-Saxon England", and it definitely helped give me a head-start with what would otherwise have been a pretty daunting read.


    15. This book is very well regarded by Early Mediaeval archaeologists and has become recommended reading for a generation of university students in Britain. Whether because of other circumstances in my life at the time or not, I'm afraid I wasn't convinced.







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