Underland: A Deep Time Journey

Underland A Deep Time Journey Discover the hidden worlds beneath our feetIn Underland Robert Macfarlane takes us on a journey into the worlds beneath our feet From the ice blue depths of Greenland s glaciers to the underground n

  • Title: Underland: A Deep Time Journey
  • Author: Robert Macfarlane
  • ISBN: 0393242145
  • Page: 347
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Discover the hidden worlds beneath our feetIn Underland, Robert Macfarlane takes us on a journey into the worlds beneath our feet From the ice blue depths of Greenland s glaciers, to the underground networks by which trees communicate, from Bronze Age burial chambers to the rock art of remote Arctic sea caves, this is a deep time voyage into the planet s past and futur Discover the hidden worlds beneath our feetIn Underland, Robert Macfarlane takes us on a journey into the worlds beneath our feet From the ice blue depths of Greenland s glaciers, to the underground networks by which trees communicate, from Bronze Age burial chambers to the rock art of remote Arctic sea caves, this is a deep time voyage into the planet s past and future Global in its geography, gripping in its voice and haunting in its implications, Underland is a work of huge range and power, and a remarkable new chapter in Macfarlane s long term exploration of landscape and the human heart Get A Copy Kindle Store Online StoresAudibleBarnes NobleWalmart eBooksApple BooksGoogle PlayAbebooksBook DepositoryIndigoAlibrisBetter World BooksIndieBoundLibraries Or buy for Hardcover, 384 pages Expected publication June 4th 2019 by W W Norton Company first published May 2nd 2019 More Details ISBN 0393242145 ISBN13 9780393242140 Other Editions 6 All Editions Add a New Edition Combine Less Detail edit details Win a Copy of This Book Underland A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane Release date Jun 04, 2019 Enter to win a copy of a haunting voyage into the planet s past and future, from the best selling, award winning author of Landmarks and The Old Ways Enter to win a copy of a haunting voyage into the planet s past and future, from the best selling, award winning author of Landmarks and The Old Ways.Hailed as the great nature writer of this generation Wall Street Journal , Robert Macfarlane is the celebrated author of prize winning books about the intersection between the human and the natural world In Underland, he delivers his masterwork an epic exploration of Earth s vast subterranean landscape in myth, literature, memory, and the land itself Global in its geography, contemporary in its concerns, and written with great lyricism and power, Underland uncovers our complex, crucial relationship with the worlds beneath our feet Enter Giveaway Format Print book

    Giveaway ends in a 0 if false time_left days_left else time_left days_left days and if false time_left Math.floor hours_left%24 10 time_left Math.floor hours_left%24 %10 else time_left Math.floor hours_left%24 time_left Math.floor minutes_left%60 10 time_left Math.floor minutes_left%10 time_left Math.floor secs_left%60 10 time_left Math.floor secs_left%10 documenttElementById timer_287819nerHTML time_left timer_287819_updateTimer var timer_287819_updater setInterval timer_287819_updateTimer, 100

    Availability 25 copies available, 784 people requesting

    Giveaway dates Jan 15 Feb 12, 2019

    Countries available U.S

    View details Friend Reviews To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up Reader QA To ask other readers questions about Underland, please sign up Recent Questions What do you think guys abt Underland Do you like it like 7 months ago Add your answer See 1 question about Underland Lists with This Book This book is not yet featured on Listopia Add this book to your favorite list Community Reviews Showing 1 44 Rating details Sort Default Filter Jan 28, 2019 Alex Sarll added it review of another edition Macfarlane s latest book is his weirdest and most magical, his most political, and definitely his darkest Maybe also his best It s a coming to terms with the Anthropocene that is aware of the issues with that term, and which at times feels like it would be at home with Donna Haraway s alternate coinage of the Cthulhucene not least when a melting glacier exposes something ancient and horrifying which for a moment resembles a black pyramid Alan Garner gets a mention early on, but that s Macfarlane s latest book is his weirdest and most magical, his most political, and definitely his darkest Maybe also his best It s a coming to terms with the Anthropocene that is aware of the issues with that term, and which at times feels like it would be at home with Donna Haraway s alternate coinage of the Cthulhucene not least when a melting glacier exposes something ancient and horrifying which for a moment resembles a black pyramid Alan Garner gets a mention early on, but that s for his early work, whereas the excursions into deep places and deep time here reminded me of the haunting, fragmentary Boneland Also of A Land, come to that, though with Jacquetta Hawkes faith in a kind of permanence sorely shaken by recent discoveries Elsewhere, as his voyages into the underdark strip Rob of light, voice, verticality, turning at times into literal dungeon crawls at one point he s wriggling along like a snake , I was reminded of Veins of the Earth though while some of the explorations detailed here may not have been strictly legal, spoilers Macfarlane doesn t actually end up resorting to cannibalism as everyone in that book seems doomed to do Or not that he admits here, anyway For a final reference point, the occasional litanies of ancient interments around the world, complete with reminders that these utterly alien people cared about their dead too, made me wonder if the crazy sod weren t trying to pull off a global Urne Buriall, and strangest of all, or less succeeding Underland left me at times with a similar sense of deep horror at the fragility of the moment, mingled with a strange and almost serene acceptance, in a way few books other than Urne Buriall ever have Albeit always with the awareness that, where Browne s memento mori was in a sense on an individual scale, nowadays it feels like the Reaper is limbering up for a trolley dash.The theme, in case you hadn t gathered from my free associated rhapsody there, is the subterranean, the hidden worlds beneath our feet This can mean anything from tooling around in tunnels under the seabed in a Transit van with a game old geezer called Neil, to the search for dark matter carried out in a hushed space honestly known as a Time Projection Chamber There s an underground party which really is underground, a gathering for a literal subculture in Paris Occasionally these interactions strike the false note of a TV documentary where the presenter affects wide eyed innocence as they ask an expert to explain something the presenter obviously already knows I find it very difficult to believe that Rob doesn t recognise a Mithraeum when he sees one But for the most part they capture what an alert and affable soul he is, happy to talk to and learn from anyone And elsewhere the mind boggling is clearly genuine, as when he tramps Epping Forest with the brilliantly named Merlin Sheldrake, whose sincere opinion is, never mind Marvel, fungus is the real superhero Sheldrake makes a strong case for this, too, though it d be one of those revisionist takes which emphasise the sheer weirdness and inhumanity of superheroes The one learns about fungus, the way it transmits messages not just fungus to fungus but between trees of different species, the way that not only the boundaries of species but the edges of an individual organism get muddied, the Jeff Vandermeer reads like he s writing kitchen sink realism And that s before we even get to the notion of earth tides It s strange how a book about the ground can leave one feeling so absolutely the opposite of grounded Over and over we come back to the notion of things buried coming to light again as the Earth shifts, ever so as we throw its natural rhythms out of alignment so ancient anthrax is resurfacing as the ice melts, old hunger stones as the lakes fall, and chemical weapons from our recent past come back thanks to the subtler but no less destructive chemical damage we ve done to the atmosphere with all that CO2 Sometimes in the later chapters, I felt the sections about land which had until recently been under ice might be a bit of a cheat, but the family resemblance just about holds it together, and it all comes round at the last to a wonderful section about the deep storage facilities for nuclear waste, intended to warn off investigation even after our cultures, languages, maybe species have gone all of it tied here to some truly ingenious, insidious thoughts on the Kalevala I say at the last a lovely epilogue follows, and even in the backmatter there s a bit lurking, including one brilliant twist hidden in the Acknowledgments.Two last thoughts I don t entirely buy the etymological speculation that even the name humanity derives from humando , burial it s wonderfully poetic, but seems a needless extra complication when we can already derive it from humus , earth, which ties in to so many creation myths anyway.I love that a book this mythic and thoughtful and even hortatory can also be summed up with a Fast Show punchline, given that each of the author s voyages finds him in a hole, with an owl Coincidentally, the one time I played the old Marvel RPG, I made a character with fungus abilities He was far too powerful for balance, and only debatably viable as hero rather than villain And this was so long ago that we were still being told fungi were plants, so you can imagine how much terrifying he d be in light of recent scholarship Netgalley ARC Also, I ve known Rob on and off since school But, you know, you read someone s first book because they re a mate you don t keep reading up to the seventh unless they re eminently readable flag 4 likesLike see review Dec 19, 2018 Meg rated it it was amazing review of another edition A masterful poet and naturalist explores the wonders beneath our feet.I had read and loved Macfarlane s The Old Ways a few years back and while this was a very different book in many ways, I still felt much of the same sense of quite reverence for the natural world around us.This was a book I enjoyed most when I had a short chunk of time to immerse myself in a chapter This isn t a book to race through Like Macfarlane himself does in this book, it is best if you allow yourself the space to dig A masterful poet and naturalist explores the wonders beneath our feet.I had read and loved Macfarlane s The Old Ways a few years back and while this was a very different book in many ways, I still felt much of the same sense of quite reverence for the natural world around us.This was a book I enjoyed most when I had a short chunk of time to immerse myself in a chapter This isn t a book to race through Like Macfarlane himself does in this book, it is best if you allow yourself the space to dig deep flag Like see review View 1 comment Feb 25, 2015 Diana Hale rated it really liked it review of another edition Finally got round to finishing this, re reading most of it A mixed bunch of essays, some fairly dense flag Like see review PD Sand rated it it was amazing Jan 07, 2019 Mim rated it liked it Dec 14, 2015 Mil Norman risch rated it it was amazing Aug 06, 2017 Veery Huleatt rated it really liked it Dec 20, 2018 Eleanora rated it really liked it Jun 20, 2018 Matt Blackstock rated it it was amazing Jan 09, 2019 Jamie rated it liked it Nov 24, 2017 Diarmid Sullivan rated it liked it Feb 13, 2015 Dominic rated it liked it Oct 08, 2015 Bar etin rated it it was amazing Jan 12, 2019 Stephen rated it really liked it Dec 27, 2018 Bert marked it as to read Aug 16, 2013 Jan marked it as to read Aug 16, 2013 Misha Mathew marked it as to read Dec 29, 2013 Ron Caves marked it as to read Mar 14, 2014 James Fairbairn marked it as to read Mar 16, 2014 Norton marked it as to read Jan 01, 2015 Hank Ratzesberger marked it as to read Feb 10, 2015 Pam marked it as to read Mar 03, 2015 Tegan Lewis marked it as to read Mar 22, 2017 Reuben marked it as to read Apr 30, 2017 Mirjam Berkelder marked it as to read Aug 01, 2017 spencer added it Sep 04, 2017 Michaux marked it 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      347 Robert Macfarlane
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    About "Robert Macfarlane"

    1. Robert Macfarlane

      Robert Macfarlane is a British nature writer and literary critic Educated at Nottingham High School, Pembroke College, Cambridge and Magdalen College, Oxford, he is currently a Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and teaches in the Faculty of English at Cambridge.

    668 thoughts on “Underland: A Deep Time Journey”

    1. Macfarlane s latest book is his weirdest and most magical, his most political, and definitely his darkest Maybe also his best It s a coming to terms with the Anthropocene that is aware of the issues with that term, and which at times feels like it would be at home with Donna Haraway s alternate coinage of the Cthulhucene not least when a melting glacier exposes something ancient and horrifying which for a moment resembles a black pyramid Alan Garner gets a mention early on, but that s Macfarlan [...]


    2. A masterful poet and naturalist explores the wonders beneath our feet.I had read and loved Macfarlane s The Old Ways a few years back and while this was a very different book in many ways, I still felt much of the same sense of quite reverence for the natural world around us.This was a book I enjoyed most when I had a short chunk of time to immerse myself in a chapter This isn t a book to race through Like Macfarlane himself does in this book, it is best if you allow yourself the space to dig A [...]



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