The Blue Max

The Blue Max The most coveted decoration in all of Imperial Germany the Blue Max was the symbol of power fame and prestige beyond ordinary mortals This is the story of the airmen in the Luftstreitkr fte who kill

  • Title: The Blue Max
  • Author: Jack D. Hunter
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 493
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • The most coveted decoration in all of Imperial Germany, the Blue Max was the symbol of power, fame and prestige beyond ordinary mortals This is the story of the airmen in the Luftstreitkr fte who killed for it during the First World War and died for it.

    • ↠ The Blue Max || â PDF Download by ↠ Jack D. Hunter
      493 Jack D. Hunter
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      Posted by:Jack D. Hunter
      Published :2019-02-12T06:36:47+00:00

    About "Jack D. Hunter"

    1. Jack D. Hunter

      Hunter was born in Hamilton, Ohio, on June 4, 1921, the son of Whitney G and Irene Dayton Hunter Ironically, while his father, whose long career with the Du Pont Company began as a paint color evaluator because of his sensitivity to colors, Hunter was red green blind He graduated with a BA in journalism from Penn State University in 1943 During World War II, Hunter joined the U.S Army, but when he could not recognize the color of flares or follow tracer bullets he was transferred to counter intelligence in a move that spared him the fate of most of the others in his infantry class death on Omaha Beach during D Day.Because he spoke German, having taught himself and then studied it in college, Hunter was sent to Germany just after the war ended The Allies had discovered that some high ranking Nazis had gone underground and were waiting until the political atmosphere settled down, at which point the Nazis would infiltrate the new German government As a 24 year old lieutenant, Hunter, disguised as a Lithuanian black marketeer, engineered a sting called Operation Nursery , which resulted in the arrest of over 1000 Nazi plotters in a single night He was awarded the Bronze Star Operation Nursery, including Jack Hunter s role in it forms the basis of the nonfiction book The Axmann Conspiracy The Nazi Plan for a Fourth Reich and How the U.S Army Defeated It, Berkley Books Penguin , Sept 2012.After the war, Hunter worked in various journalistic capacities, as a public relations executive for Du Pont, and as a speech writer in Washington D.C.His first novel was The Blue Max , and the publisher remarked that, as a new author, they would not spend the money to have an artist paint a color cover for his book Hunter, who often dabbled in water colors, volunteered to paint it himself The publisher liked it and used it, and Hunter considered that cover painting to be his first sale He then turned what was once a hobby into a second career as an aviation artist.Hunter was the author of 17 novels, his last being The Ace , which was published on October 1, 2008 Like The Blue Max, which is still popular after 44 years, The Ace deals with World War I aviation, but focuses on the human costs and chaotic conditions that belabored the Americans in their need to build a world class air force virtually overnight.During the 1980s, Hunter served as the writing coach for reporters working at the now defunct Jacksonville Journal and for the Florida Times Union, which still publishes in Jacksonville In this role, which continued three days a week for 10 years, Hunter provided encouragement, tutelage and support to hundreds of journalists, some of whom went on to work at The New York Times, The Denver Post, The Miami Herald and in many other venues.He lived in St Augustine, Florida, until he died at age 87 on April 13, 2009.

    687 thoughts on “The Blue Max”

    1. Like many readers of this novel I came to it via the George Peppard film adaptation which I remember seeing back in the Seventies. This is an excellent example of a so-so book making a better movie. Peppard's Bruno Stachel is a more sympathetic character than the book version though, as described, he is as handsome as the movie star in his prime. To be honest, I found it very refreshing that Hunter felt absolutely no need to soften Bruno's edges in any way to make him remotely likeable. That isn [...]


    2. Like many other reviewers of this novel, I picked up this novel after having seen on TV during the 1970s the movie adaptation of "The Blue Max", which impressed me a lot. The novel is centered on Bruno Stachel, a young man of humble origins (his father worked in a modest hotel in the Black Forest), who had transferred from the infantry to the Imperial German Air Service. As a newly minted fighter pilot, he arrives at a Jasta (fighter squadron) situated not far from the Front. It is early 1918, [...]


    3. I have always understood that: The Blue Max is a classic It is a read that ties old European eccentricities that carried over to the Nazi war machine. It is the placement of the Pilots into an old world society within the insanity of an economically driven war all driven around the coveted Blue Max.(less)


    4. A very good book. It made me believe I was alive in 1918, and on a Jasta airbase. A bit slow to start but the pace built up gradually until I was totally absorbed and believed I was Bruno Statchel.


    5. Historically accurate and well characterised, Hunter's book is, in my opinion, better than the film. Stachel is a well-drawn anti-hero with whom it is possible to feel sympathy. Recommended to all those interested in Ww1 aviation.


    6. 3.5 stars for me. The Blue Max tells the story of a German pilot in WW1, and his quest for glory. We get battle action, drama, politics, blackmail, humor and more all wrapped in a nice character focused story. Recommended for aviation buffs and those who like war stories.


    7. For the record, this is the 1965 paperback edition, but not listed by . It has lain fallow on my shelf until recently. It still has all 280 pages, with a similiar cover. The book is less an air combat adventure than a psycological examination of the participants. The hero, or protangonist, a German pilot in World War I, has what we today call "issues." He's alcoholic and has few scruples over how he achieves his ambitions. The members of his jasta (the author will toss a number of German terms a [...]


    8. After watching the George Pappard DVD recently I vowed to pick up the novel and give it a reread. I had originally read the novel when in college when I was supposed to be reading such trivial works as Leviathan by Locke and The Prince by Machiavelli and other light reading that History majors always seem to receive. I remember not being all that impressed with the book and in a rare instance when the book is placed next to the movie the movie is of a better quality. With that knowledge and know [...]


    9. This is an intense look at a pilot with psychological and drinking problems. I think he is a man with low self esteem who turns to drink to help him deal with his anxiety. The more this man achieves, the more he turns to drink until on the day of his most brilliant victory, he doesn't remember anything.I found learning more about WWI pilots to be fascinating and the combats scenes exciting. I listened to this book and the narrator did a good job with the different characters and accents.


    10. A good WW1 air story however as I have read a lot of real accounts and biographies I found that like many such books there were problems. Technically the scenes are painted well but the characterisation and the somewhat contrived plot both combine to cause the story to just not 'feel right'One of the very few books I have read where I felt the movie was better than book - despite the movie's faults


    11. I have always understood that: The Blue Max is a classic It is a read that ties old European eccentricities that carried over to the Nazi war machine. It is the placement of the Pilots into an old world society within the insanity of an economically driven war all driven around the coveted Blue Max.(less)


    12. Hunter did an awesome job with this novel. It's one of those so filled with realistic action and emotional reactions that once I started it, I couldn't put it down. And, I've been back to re-read it twice. This doesn't read like a history book, it reads more like I've been transported there and I'm living the horror and terror for myself.


    13. The mid-'60s George Peppard film version of this 1964 novel, once such a popular and oft-mentioned guy flick, seems to have strayed off the radar. But it was a rollicking good entertainment, and a quick skim of the novel bodes well, too. Soon


    14. This book seemed to lack much depth. I felt it started to get better but would have like to see him continue with both women and see where it played out.




    15. I enjoyed reading this book, take you on a bit of a roller coaster, you want it to end well, a couple of twists I didn't forsee



    16. Found it difficult to have any empathy/sympathy with the major characters. An interesting study of selfishness under extreme pressure.


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