Roman Art: Romulus to Constantine

Roman Art Romulus to Constantine Ideal for students who are studying Roman art for the first time this exceptionally well illustrated text explores Roman art in the traditional historical manner with a focus on painting sculpture

  • Title: Roman Art: Romulus to Constantine
  • Author: Nancy H. Ramage Andrew Ramage
  • ISBN: 9780131504875
  • Page: 113
  • Format: Paperback
  • Ideal for students who are studying Roman art for the first time, this exceptionally well illustrated text explores Roman art in the traditional historical manner with a focus on painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts It assumes no prior acquaintance with the classical world, and explains the necessary linguistic, historical, religious, social, and politicalIdeal for students who are studying Roman art for the first time, this exceptionally well illustrated text explores Roman art in the traditional historical manner with a focus on painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts It assumes no prior acquaintance with the classical world, and explains the necessary linguistic, historical, religious, social, and political background needed to fully understand Roman art.

    Romulus Romulus r m j l s was the legendary founder and first king of Rome Various traditions attribute the establishment of many of Rome s oldest legal, political, religious, and social institutions to Romulus and his contemporaries. Roman art Roman art refers to the visual arts made in Ancient Rome and in the territories of the Roman Empire Roman art includes architecture, painting, sculpture and mosaic work. Roman Art Ancient Rome Roman Art Term art of the Ancient Rome is usually used to describe art created in Rome, but having no tight cultural connections with the native art of a specific region, being under the reigns of the Empire. List of Rulers of the Roman Empire Lists of Rulers A chronological list of the emperors of ancient Rome, covering the Julio Claudian, Flavian, Antonine, and Severan dynasties the Gallic, Palmyrene, and Eastern Roman empires and the Constantine period. Timeline of Ancient Rome key dates, from Romulus and What are the key dates in the timeline of Roman history From what the Romans believed to be the foundation of Rome in BC, to the Punic Wars in BC and the fall of Rome in AD here are key dates in the history of Rome and its mighty empire Roman Empire ancient state bc ad Britannica Roman Empire, the ancient empire, centred on the city of Rome, that was established in bce following the demise of the Roman Republic and continuing to the Roman Deities Timeless Myths Roman Deities contained reference to the pantheon of gods and goddesses worshipped in Rome. Ancient Rome and Roman Empire coloring pages Free Ancient Rome and Roman Empire Coloring pages Select from printable Coloring pages of cartoons, animals, nature, Bible and many . Romulus and Remus Ancient History Encyclopedia In Roman mythology, Romulus and his twin brother Remus were the founders of the city of Rome They were the children of Rhea Silvia and Mars or in some variations the demi god hero Hercules and their story is recorded by many authors including Virgil who claims their birth and adventures were fated in order for Rome to be founded. History of Ancient Rome for Kids Roman Gods and Mythology Romulus and Remus Early Roman mythology tells the story of how Rome was founded by two twin gods named Romulus and Remus Romulus and Remus both wished to found a new city.

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      Published :2019-02-13T00:24:16+00:00

    About "Nancy H. Ramage Andrew Ramage"

    1. Nancy H. Ramage Andrew Ramage

      Nancy H. Ramage Andrew Ramage Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Roman Art: Romulus to Constantine book, this is one of the most wanted Nancy H. Ramage Andrew Ramage author readers around the world.

    887 thoughts on “Roman Art: Romulus to Constantine”

    1. While the art in this book seemed quite encompassing, it seemed like every single monument and thing was so independent. There was almost no trends, basically no other explanation for certain pictures except for the description of what we were supposed to see.Personally I like it better when archeological books focus more on the "art" instead of the buildings and monuments and this book heavily focuses on architecture (like arches, columns and buildings). Also, it was quite a boring read, so meh [...]


    2. This was my second installment in my background reading in Classical Art and Arcaheology. So, having covered Greek Art and Archaeology, unsurprisingly I decided to tackle one of the standard textbooks in Roman art. Ramage's book is an excellent introduction to the topic. She structures it by period, starting with the Etruscans, continuing through the rather scarce remains of Republican Rome and, then, goes by dynasty through the Imperial period. Each chapter gives an excellent overview of the ma [...]


    3. This is a good book for the researchers of Art in Ancient Rome, well illustrated and with a holistic approach to art and architecture. As it happens with most books about history, though, new researches are being made and new facts surface that are not included, so I would suggest to the reader to double check when inquiring on specific dates and facts. Also, I felt that the analysis of the subject-matter of some works, from time to time, was more subjective than it should be. Otherwise, I manag [...]


    4. read for my class: Ancient ArtI hated this class, but the reading was okay. I felt that Ramage spent too little time on some very important monuments on which entire books an theses have been written but then doddled on some works which I felt were rather insignificant. It had lots of illustrations and schematic plans, however, which are always helpful when discussing Ancient monuments which are frequently in ruin. The most strange thing about this book was the apparent phallic obsession the aut [...]


    5. Well, it's a very clear oversight and contained many pictures. So it's definitely useful to own as a reference. However, the text really irritated me at times, like when they insisted on talking about how Julia Domna's scheming personality was obviously reflected in her facial featureswhat? Physiognomy hasn't made a big comeback yet, right? Or so I thought. It's not just Julia, by the way - I just thought that one was the most obviously ridiculous one, as she didn't really have a particularly st [...]


    6. This book kind of drives me crazy - it is the best textbook for images of Roman art, but the text leaves a lot to be desired. The discussion of the works is almost exclusively in terms of their aesthetic qualities with little about cultural context or iconography (especially in the early chapters). I still use this book for my classes on Classical and Roman art and archaeology, but have to supplement it heavily with additional readings on these issues.


    7. Everything you want to know about Roman Art and then some.I actually used an earlier edition for my Ancient art course in college. Very clear and straightforward, which can be a little tedious. Good coverage of the development of Roman Art from its Etruscan forerunners through the reign of Constantine the Great. Would benefit from more color photos. My favorite aspect was the development of portraiture by studying the images of Roman emperors.


    8. Ramage and Ramage--as this book was always referred to by my lecturers--was the standard text we used in our art history classes. It works well as both an introduction to the subject for complete beginners, and a reference for those whose studies are a little more advanced. The text is readable, the photos are of high quality, and there are plenty of plans and maps.


    9. Loved this! At first it seemed like it was going to be a bit of a daunting read, but the pages are more so filled with images than text, even including many full paged ones. The book spans from the Villanovans to Constantine I, so granted it does not go insanely in depth into each art piece, but it is still a wonderful read!


    10. Very interesting book, surveying Roman architecture, paintings, sculpture, sarcophagi, and engravings. The pictures were beautiful and informative, and the authors do a great job of pointing out detail and providing interpretation. I especially enjoyed learning about Roman architecture.


    11. Re-reading segments of this to supplement some other reading. It's a good resource with many pictures. I suppose it's a testament to it's quality that both Classical Studies departments I have studied under use this an their introductory text (CU Boulder and RMWC in case you're curious).




    12. I had to read this for uni. Beautiful pictures, but that’s pretty much it. Incredibly basic, to the point where it’s fairly useless, but still so expensive! Unbelievable.


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