The Far Mosque

The Far Mosque These gently fragmented narrative lyrics pursue enlightenment in long elegant yet plain spoken dark yet ecstatic lines Ali travels by water and by night seeking the Far Mosque and its overarching p

  • Title: The Far Mosque
  • Author: Kazim Ali
  • ISBN: 9781882295531
  • Page: 143
  • Format: Paperback
  • These gently fragmented narrative lyrics pursue enlightenment in long, elegant yet plain spoken, dark yet ecstatic lines Ali travels by water and by night, seeking the Far Mosque and its overarching paradox that when God and Self are one, an ascent into Heaven is a voyage within.

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      Posted by:Kazim Ali
      Published :2019-09-27T17:09:32+00:00

    About "Kazim Ali"

    1. Kazim Ali

      Kazim Ali born 1971 is an American poet, novelist, essayist and professor His most recent books are The Disappearance of Seth Etruscan Press, 2009 and Bright Felon Autobiography and Cities Wesleyan University Press, 2009 His honors include an Individual Excellence Award from the Ohio Arts Council His poetry and essays have been featured in many literary journals and magazines including The American Poetry Review, Boston Review, Barrow Street, Jubilat, The Iowa Review, West Branch and Massachusetts Review, and in anthologies including The Best American Poetry 2007.In 2003 he co founded the independent press Nightboat Books, and served as its publisher from 2004 to 2007, and currently serves as a founding editor.Ali is an assistant professor of Creative Writing at Oberlin College and teaches in the Stonecoast MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Southern Maine Previously, he taught in the Liberal Arts Department of The Culinary Institute of America, at Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania, and at Monroe College.He was born in the UK to parents of Indian descent, and raised in Canada and the United States Kazim Ali received a B.A and an M.A in English Literature from the University at Albany, and an MFA in Creative Writing from New York University.

    842 thoughts on “The Far Mosque”

    1. Transcendent and powerful with flashes of Rumi - Kazim Ali points out that the far mosque is found within - and needs to be unlocked by keys found in the heart.


    2. Kazim Ali's collection of poetry are shaped by their own growth and search for meaning. Though often in fragments or snippets rather than any classical form, their have shape and are accessible as they are rich in an eloquence that is often epigrammatic:"When a Scholar pauses by a closed doorShe may not be listening to the music, but to the door""Carry what you can in your hands. Scatter the rest."There is a humble humanity and a deep compassion in Ali's words. As mush as this collection reflect [...]


    3. Love it. "A poet is someone who can pour light into a cupand then raise it to nourish your beautiful--perhaps parched--holy mouth." (Hafiz)Drink up this book!


    4. Why not be an acolyte of the twisting ribbon of river?Said: In the RainThese moments against the years you cannot believe.This hover of music winging down from the mountainsyou cannot believe.But here in the trees, here above the river, here as the seasonstitches itself into fog then frost, you will.Here as you unfold, unsummon, uncry, you will. Unopened, you will. Unhappen, you will.These moments against the years you will. Unmoment you will. The Return of MusicBe gray here, be broken and straf [...]


    5. Totally unlike what I typically read (and write) but totally enjoyable for it. The breathy, throughly modern evocation of Sufism in "Dear Rumi" and "Hunger" alone was worth the time in reading the book.







    6. I am trying to read a book by each of the headline poets for the 2017 Mass Poetry Festival in May, and I started with this one. I personally found the fragmentation sometimes hard to follow, but there were some really fabulous lines and images in this collection, and it was a fascinating blend of Western culture and Islam.


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