The Origin of Species

The Origin of Species Perhaps the most readable and accessible of the great works of scientific imagination The Origin of Species sold out on the day it was published in Theologians quickly labeled Charles Darwin the

  • Title: The Origin of Species
  • Author: Charles Darwin J.W. Burrow
  • ISBN: 9780140432053
  • Page: 366
  • Format: Paperback
  • Perhaps the most readable and accessible of the great works of scientific imagination, The Origin of Species sold out on the day it was published in 1859 Theologians quickly labeled Charles Darwin the most dangerous man in England, and, as the Saturday Review noted, the uproar over the book quickly passed beyond the bounds of the study and lecture room into the drawing rPerhaps the most readable and accessible of the great works of scientific imagination, The Origin of Species sold out on the day it was published in 1859 Theologians quickly labeled Charles Darwin the most dangerous man in England, and, as the Saturday Review noted, the uproar over the book quickly passed beyond the bounds of the study and lecture room into the drawing room and the public street Yet, after reading it, Darwin s friend and colleague T H Huxley had a different reaction How extremely stupid not to have thought of that Based largely on Darwin s experience as a naturalist while on a five year voyage aboard H.M.S Beagle, The Origin of Species set forth a theory of evolution and natural selection that challenged contemporary beliefs about divine providence and the immutability of species A landmark con tribution to philosophical and scientific thought, this edition also includes an introductory historical sketch and a glossary Darwin later added to the original text.Charles Darwin grew up considered, by his own account, a very ordinary boy, rather below the common standard of intellect A quirk of fate kept him from the career his father had deemed appro priate that of a country parson when a botanist recommended Darwin for an appointment as a naturalist aboard H.M.S Beagle from 1831 to 1836 Darwin is also the author of the five volume work Zoology of the Voyage of the Beagle 1839 and The Descent of Man 1871.

    Origin Get great PC and Mac games on Origin Play the latest RPGs, shooters, Sims games . Origin definition of origin by The Free Dictionary origin A point of origination The initial stage of a developmental process One s ancestors or their character or one s ancestral derivation Origin Definition of Origin by Merriam Webster Definition of origin for English Language Learners the point or place where something begins or is created the source or cause of something the place, social situation, or type of family Online Etymology Dictionary Origin, history and meaning The online etymology dictionary is the internet s go to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language. The Accidental History of the Symbol Science Smithsonian The origin of the symbol itself, one of the most graceful characters on the keyboard, is something of a mystery. On the Origin of Species On the Origin of Species, published on November , is a work of scientific literature by Charles Darwin which is considered to be the foundation of evolutionary biology Darwin s book introduced the scientific theory that populations evolve over the course of generations through a process of natural selection It presented a body of evidence that the diversity of life arose by L Origine du monde L Origine du monde The Origin of the World is a picture painted in oil on canvas by the French artist Gustave Courbet in It is a close up view of the genitals and abdomen of a naked woman, lying on a bed with legs spread The framing of the nude body, with head, arms and lower legs outside of view, emphasizes the eroticism of the work. Etymology of the the F Word ORIGIN The second path has the word deriving from the short form of For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge Variously, adulterers, rapists, child molesters, and them wot engaged in premarital hanky panky were, as part of their punishment, sentenced to wear a placard announcing their wrongdoing According to this origin, The Meaning and History of First Names Behind the Name Nov , Find the meaning, history and popularity of given names from around the world Get ideas for baby names or discover your own name s history The Meaning and History of First Names Behind the Name Pennywise the Monster Clown s Origin Explained Screen Rant Sep , THE ORIGINS OF IT The creature called IT is obviously not a clown at all IT is an ancient evil being that is perhaps billions of years old, as old as the universe itself IT comes from the void that contains our entire universe called the Macroverse this is also referred to as the Todash Darkness in Stephen King s Dark Tower novels.

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    About "Charles Darwin J.W. Burrow"

    1. Charles Darwin J.W. Burrow

      Charles Robert Darwin was an English naturalist, eminent as a collector and geologist, who proposed and provided scientific evidence that all species of life have evolved over time from common ancestors through the process he called natural selection The fact that evolution occurs became accepted by the scientific community and the general public in his lifetime, while his theory of natural selection came to be widely seen as the primary explanation of the process of evolution in the 1930s, and now forms the basis of modern evolutionary theory In modified form, Darwin s scientific discovery remains the foundation of biology, as it provides a unifying logical explanation for the diversity of life.Darwin developed his interest in natural history while studying medicine at Edinburgh University, then theology at Cambridge His five year voyage on the Beagle established him as a geologist whose observations and theories supported Charles Lyell s uniformitarian ideas, and publication of his journal of the voyage made him famous as a popular author Puzzled by the geographical distribution of wildlife and fossils he collected on the voyage, Darwin investigated the transmutation of species and conceived his theory of natural selection in 1838 Although he discussed his ideas with several naturalists, he needed time for extensive research and his geological work had priority He was writing up his theory in 1858 when Alfred Russel Wallace sent him an essay which described the same idea, prompting immediate joint publication of both of their theories.His 1859 book On the Origin of Species established evolution by common descent as the dominant scientific explanation of diversification in nature He examined human evolution and sexual selection in The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, followed by The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals His research on plants was published in a series of books, and in his final book, he examined earthworms and their effect on soil.In recognition of Darwin s pre eminence, he was one of only five 19th century UK non royal personages to be honoured by a state funeral, and was buried in Westminster Abbey, close to John Herschel and Isaac Newton Arabic

    166 thoughts on “The Origin of Species”

    1. such a freakin' genius! and the sadest part is, that his "science" literally killed him. if you've read a lot in Darwin (as I have) you come to understand that as a religious man, his studies seriously conflicted with his beliefs. I hate it when I hear someone say that Darwin says, "we come from monkeys." because that is not the case.his theory is on EVOLUTION, not monkeys. all he wanted people to understand was adaptation and survival of the fittest is really a simple concept, and daily life- p [...]


    2. Charles Darwin changed the world when he wrote this book.I mean if you think about it logically, no other book has had such a powerful impact on the way humanity views the earth; yes, we have countless religious doctrine, but never before had there been a book that so drastically alternated our perceptions of the mechanisms that are behind our existence. I’m not talking about on a spiritual level, a level of ideas that cannot be scientifically proven or unproven, but on an actual physical leve [...]


    3. Dear Carol,Thank you for your mail, and of course I remember meeting you on the flight last month! It was a very interesting discussion and I'm still thinking about it. The semester has now started here at Creationist U and I am working hard, but I found time to read the book you recommended. And I'm glad I did, because it was really a lot better than I thought it would be.I guess I was expecting Darwin to be like Richard Dawkins, but he was respectful of religious ideas. And it was great that h [...]


    4. قد يكون هذا الكتاب هو أعظم كتاب انتجته البشرية. داروين غير كل شيء في مسار البشرية من نظرة البشر لأنفسهم حتى نظرة البشر تجاه الكون والطبيعةمن اكبر المغالطات التي تواجهها اليوم عملية التطور اعتبارها بأنها نظرية. مصطلح نظرية دارون أو نظرية التطور كانت صالحة قبل قرن ولكن اليوم ع [...]


    5. On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life = On Natural Selection‭, Charles Darwin عنوانها: بنیاد انواع: به وسیله انتخاب طبیعی یا کشمکش و نبرد برای زیستن؛ بنیاد انواع: به وسیله انتخاب طبیعی یا تنازغ بقا در عالم طبیعت؛ انتخاب طبیعی؛ تکامل؛ بنیاد انواع؛ منشا انواع؛ خاستگا [...]


    6. Edits for NR because I love him that much. This:"This preservation of favourable variations and the rejection of injurious variations, I call Natural Selection. Variations neither useful not injurious would not be affected by natural selection, and would be left a fluctuating element, as perhaps we see in the species called polymorphic."We shall best understand the probable course of natural selection by taking the case of a country undergoing some physical change, for instance, of climate. The [...]


    7. “One general law, leading to the advancement of all organic beings, namely, multiply, vary, let the strongest live and the weakest die.” ― Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species It is amazing to think that this mild, scientific book published a little less than 155 years ago caused (and is still causing) such a complete storm. I'm surprised at how adapted we have become (or at least the segment of those people on the planet who don't reject Darwin's theory of natural selection as counter to [...]


    8. Ah, you can't really review a book like this. It's almost complete transcended its role as a seminal scientific tome and become a legitimate historic artefact. You can't review a historic artefact.This is a fantastic read, even viewed in a completely different way to how it would have been read at the time. It really is amazing how much evolutionary biology Darwin was able to formulate almost a century before Watson and Crick's discovery of DNA. It boggles the mind what Darwin could have been ca [...]


    9. My book group selected this book for discussion probably because of the historic impact it has had on the field of science. However, I found it to be very worthy of respect from a literary viewpoint. Charles Darwin's writing comes across as a methodical thinker and patient explainer to many recalcitrant readers who are determined not to believe a word he says. He had me convinced after only a couple dozen pages, but he kept doing what seemed to me to be piling on observation after observation, e [...]


    10. "If, however, a caterpillar were taken out of a hammock made up, for instance, to the third stage, and were put into one finished up to the sixth stage, so that much of its work was already done for it, far from feeling the benefit of this, it was much embarrassed, and, in order to complete its hammock, seemed forced to start from the third stage."On the Origin of Species is one of the most important books ever written. Although a lot of people-scientists, naturalists and the like-were coming to [...]


    11. I swear I cannot figure what all the fuss is about. This is a science book. It was sometimes a bit tough to read because of the depth into detail. If I were an anthropologist I'm sure I would more appreciate that detail, but as a layman it did at times seem too thick. If I were lost in an uncivilized world and had only two books, I would want a Webster's dictionary and this Origin of Species. The dictionary to learn word definitions and this book to learn about the flora and fauna around me. For [...]


    12. Decry or applaud it, there's no question this work has had a profound effect not just on science, but the culture at large. What I wouldn't read this book for is the science, or in an effort to either defend or refute the argument for evolution. The core of Darwin's argument certainly is still what was taught in my Catholic high school biology class (taught by a nun). In a nutshell, the theory is that given there are wide-ranging subtle Variations among organisms, the Malthusian Struggle for Exi [...]


    13. لا اعتقد أنه يوجد من العلماء من أحدث أثرًا في حياة البشر ومعتقداتهم وثوابتهم كما فعل داروين، وفي دراسته تلك يقدم لنا خلاصة تجاربه ودراساته، ولم أجد في الكتاب ما يؤصل فيه للفكرة الشائعة عنه بأن الإنسان في الأصل قرد، بل كان الكتاب بالكامل يناقش نظرياته وتجاربه.والملاحظ تواضع [...]


    14. This is not exactly what I would call "fun reading," but it's worth it. At times, it was hard getting through this book, mainly because it's dense and sometimes Darwin tended to drag and not get to the point, but I'm glad I finally read it. However, I think I should have read this at another point of my life - I mean, it was exasperating to read something I had just studied at a biology course I was taking. I still don't regret reading this. If you're considering on whether picking this book or [...]


    15. [ أنا لا أرى أي سبب وجيه في أن تُسبب الآراء التي قد تم تقديمها في هذا الكتاب أي صدمة للمشاعر الدينية الخاصة بأي فرد.وقد قام كاتب مرموق ولاهوتي بمكاتبتي بخصوص أنه قد تعلّم بالتدريج أن يرى أن التصور الراقي الخاص بالألوهية هو على نفس الدرجة تماماً من الإيمان بأنه قد قام بخلق العد [...]


    16. كثير ممن يعرفونني ويعلمون باطلاعي على نظرية التطور سيستغربون أن هذه هي المرة الأولى التي أقرأ فيها كتاب أصل الأنواع للعالم تشارلز دارون. بل إن سبب قراءتي لهذا الكتاب هو إبداء إحدى الصديقات استغرابها من هذا الموضوع بالذات، فهي ممن يصر على أننا يجب أن نقرأ لما كتبه الشخص ذاته [...]


    17. Are you an Evangelical Christian? Or, perhaps you are a student participating in one of nation's modern and progressive science classes, learning about the Origins of Man, but confused by the lack of scientifically observable studies missing from your text books. Fortunately for you, Darwin spent decades of his life documenting the observable changes in various species, hypothesizing about these changes and drawing some interesting conclusions about his life's work.


    18. On The Origin of SpeciesDarwin (1809-1882)Darwin published this book in 1859. It is his scientific treaty based on the idea of all organism living on the earth to be descendants from one or several original progenitors.The work is mostly a transcription of the author’s notes throughout his years of study and his famous voyage on the HMS Beagle to the Southern Hemisphere. It had likely been addressed to the quite sceptic scientific community of his time, to demonstrate his idea and to bring sup [...]


    19. 3.0 to 3.5 stars. Not anything like what I would call a "fun" read, but I am really happy that I finally read this book given the tremendous influence it has had on the history on modern scientific thinking. The book itself, while dry, is fairly accessible and is not bogged down with overly complex scientific jargon. I would read a couple of chapters a day in between my "pleasure" reading and it made the book much easier to absorb. Definitely worth reading.


    20. Richard Dawkins' narration of this book is excellent -- I enjoyed it immensely, however, without my semester of physical anthropology, the essential points would have required much more mental attention. Dawkins inserts clarifying information throughout the book and while Darwin's writing is wonderfully clear, I think more of Dawkins' notes and updates would have been an enhancement.I was surprised to see how diverse Darwin's background research was and how elegantly he wrote. He anticipated cou [...]


    21. Celebratory 2:00 am review, just great!!! When I finished this, I was definitely clapping my hands!! This is not a story if you are one of those who are mad excited to read it. It's a tome of its size that is equivalent to an encyclopedia with depth, width, and value. It's the densest nonfiction I have read. It is an attempt to read a genre I really wasn't familiar with. Since I got into reading, I believe that nonfiction is one of the genres that is most daunting to me. In 2016, I definitely at [...]


    22. What in the world made me want to read this Goliath of a science book? My goodness! I guess if I had to search deep within myself I would have to say I wanted to read anything Darwin, just to see what all the fuss was about, but mostly because of the reviews I read on . I thought The Origin of Species would turn me into the science-loving person I always thought lurked inside me.The main reason I finished it is because any science book that has had this much publicity deserves to be read and fin [...]


    23. My science education left a lot to be desired. I was never taught the Theory of Natural Selection in school but only heard it mentioned when some adults scoffed at it. Thankfully, my natural talents steered me away from a career in Biology or Genetics, so this lack of knowledge didn’t affect my career prospects. It just affected my understanding of the world. I learned years later the basics of the theory but this just piqued my interest about reading the actual book. I always have problems wi [...]


    24. كيف يمكن أن تَدرُس هذه النظرية ولا يتحرك شئ داخلك !!!! هذه النظرية تخاطب الروح هذا الكلام لن يستسيغه من ظن أن التطور رديفٌ للإلحاد سواء من المؤمنين الذين يقولون بالخلق المستقل المباشر أو من الملاحدة الذين عنونوا النظرية بالإلحاد وجعلوها عمود الأساس في فلسفتهم المتهافتة التقي [...]


    25. Having finished Origin, I am taking the liberty of adding a few comments at the top of what I posted when I first added it to my "currently-reading shelf." To the would-be classics reader who is a bit daunted at the notion of tackling a fourteen chapter science book written in 19th Century technical terms I offer the suggestion that the back half of Origin is purely optional and can be let go. The first six chapters are the most enjoyable. Four is the big one, where Darwin presents the big pitch [...]


    26. Not to my surprise, many questions that are thrown at Richard Dawkins by the creationist on debate panels have been answered as it is in this book. If only people read this by themselves!It was fascinating how the "missing links" was explained by Darwin in a context of geology. Most importantly he was indicating towards Tectonics (that was brought into light many years after darwin's time by Alfred Wegener). Clearly, Darwin was way ahead of his contemporaries. I knew it took him years to publish [...]


    27. I can now truly say that, having read the Origin of Species, I find the theory of evolution to be complete and utter hogwash. Darwin never truly gives an explanation for how microevolution can realistically extrapolated into macroevolution. Also, when he brings up objections against his theory, he gives an elaborate excuse for why he cannot prove his point rather than proving it. I am still a firm believer in Creation. It is a lot more logical than evolution.



    28. With my brand new shiny degree in geology/paleontology, this was the first book I read after commencement. I give it 5 stars for the importance of its text, not for its readability.


    29. O Homem não veio do macacoEntre o homem e o macaco há apenas um antepassado comumA adaptação e sobrevivência do mais apto!!!Aparentemente um conceito simples!


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