A World Made New: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

A World Made New Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights Unafraid to speak her mind and famously tenacious in her convictions Eleanor Roosevelt was still mourning the death of FDR when she was asked by President Truman to lead a controversial commission u

  • Title: A World Made New: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
  • Author: Mary Ann Glendon
  • ISBN: 9780375760464
  • Page: 344
  • Format: Paperback
  • Unafraid to speak her mind and famously tenacious in her convictions, Eleanor Roosevelt was still mourning the death of FDR when she was asked by President Truman to lead a controversial commission, under the auspices of the newly formed United Nations, to forge the world s first international bill of rights A World Made New is the dramatic and inspiring story of the remaUnafraid to speak her mind and famously tenacious in her convictions, Eleanor Roosevelt was still mourning the death of FDR when she was asked by President Truman to lead a controversial commission, under the auspices of the newly formed United Nations, to forge the world s first international bill of rights A World Made New is the dramatic and inspiring story of the remarkable group of men and women from around the world who participated in this historic achievement and gave us the founding document of the modern human rights movement Spurred on by the horrors of the Second World War and working against the clock in the brief window of hope between the armistice and the Cold War, they grappled together to articulate a new vision of the rights that every man and woman in every country around the world should share, regardless of their culture or religion.A landmark work of narrative history based in part on diaries and letters to which Mary Ann Glendon, an award winning professor of law at Harvard University, was given exclusive access, A World Made New is the first book devoted to this crucial turning point in Eleanor Roosevelt s life, and in world history.Finalist for the Robert F Kennedy Book Award

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    505 thoughts on “A World Made New: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights”

    1. A marvelous account of the formulation and development of the ‘Universal Declaration of Human Rights’.It really had its gestation in 1941 during the Roosevelt – Churchill meeting at Placentia Bay, off Newfoundland, during the very dark days of World War II. At that stage the spread of German Nazism seemed unstoppable. The Atlantic Charter was made with ‘Roosevelt’s freedoms’ – freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.One could say that the [...]


    2. The lioness in winter: this is a splendid account of Eleanor Roosevelt after FDR's death, when she was the guiding force on the UN committee that crafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Declaration is already a foundation to a body of international human-rights law, a foundation that has steadily grown in importance over the last half century. The book does justice to it, and to her.The title is from her nightly prayer: "Our Father, who has set a restlessness in our hearts and mad [...]



    3. I read this book a long time ago. I was thinking of it today after watching a documentary that discussed human rights. My one big takeaway from this book--and we are going back here to 2003 or 2004--was that a man named Raphael Lemkin survived the Holocaust then dedicated his life to creating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. I keep meaning to learn more about this whole thing, but the UDHR is not something that plays a prominent role in American politics, so it's not like it's on my ra [...]



    4. I’ve read lots about Eleanor’s youth as well as her married years and time as First Lady. This book taught me more about her crowning glory, the Eleanor without Franklin, when she chaired the committee that wrote the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is coming up on age 70 this year, and still has great moral stature in its challenge to “the long-standing view that a sovereign state’s treatment of its own citizens was that nation’s business and no p e else’s.” (79 [...]


    5. This served as a text book for my Human Rights class this semester, and while I found the writing to be incredibly dry, when it could have, in my opinion, been far more interesting, I learned quite a bit. Before reading, I knew very little about the founding of the United Nations, and what it took for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to come into being. Very well researched, packed with information, if you're interested in learning even more about Eleanor Roosevelt, this is a good start [...]


    6. A very interesting and easy read on the origin and mechanics of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Opened my eyes to many things. Glendon definitely approaches from the perspective of adoration for Roosevelt, and tries very hard to make the point that this is NOT a western document. She also takes on the word "universal" and argues that the precepts found in UDHR really can be found in almost every culture. Her argument is fairly good, if not 100% convincing. Well-written, at the very le [...]


    7. Very thoughtful account of a major joint undertaking with significant benefit to humankind. Insights into the cast of characters involved and the unique contribution each made. Enjoyed description of the working methods and the reflections on the value of non-binding international agreements. Some of that is relevant to my work supporting negotiations of the Universal Paris Climate Agreement. Great to get to know more about that great leader Eleanor Roosevelt.


    8. UDHR was a miracle. It took excellent leadership in Mrs. Roosevelt and some others to bring it to fruition. Both eastern and western philosophy were considered by the drafters at the UN. Those that did not vote for it (abstained/no one voted it down) did it for political reasons (Soviets did not want citizens leaving USSR/freedom of changing nationality/movement).Dr. Glendon did a good job in making the plot interesting.


    9. Eleanor Roosevelt was such an incredibly strong woman. The story of the Declaration is fascinating, but I had a hard time with all of the information crammed into 350 pages! Really makes you think about what goes into creating these documents, and how the simple meaning of a word like "dignity" can cause such drama!


    10. This book is a must read for those who want an understanding of the role Eleanor Roosevelt had in the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. She was a fascinating woman who possibly does not get the credit she deserves in shaping how the world views human rights. It is an easy book to read and deals with an important subject.


    11. This was a rather dry account of the attempt on the part of the UN to establish an internationally recognized statement regarding human rights. This attempt seems futile to me (though I have not rejected it because I haven't spent a great deal of time studying it).


    12. I feel as if I learned so much from this dense account of the formulation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. I'm looking forward to learning more about Malik, Roosevelt, and the process of recognizing human rights in our world.




    13. Very clear and gripping story of the work to make the Universal Declaration of Human Rights--and the key role Eleanor Roosevelt had in its making. A pioneering, driven woman. Eleanor, Presente!


    14. Very important piece that affirms the value and use of both the Declaration of Indpendence and UN Declaration of Human Rights.


    15. Good detailed account of the debates within the commission that created the Universal Declaration of Human Rights



    16. I only got through a portion of this book for class, but what I did manage to read I enjoyed. Eleanor sounded like she was a pretty kick-ass woman. I'd have loved to learn more about her.


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