The Coffin Tree

The Coffin Tree Wendy Law Yone opens her first novel with the phrase of a survivor Living things prefer to go on living A young woman and her older half brother are expelled from their home in Burma by a savage poli

  • Title: The Coffin Tree
  • Author: Wendy Law-Yone
  • ISBN: 9780810151413
  • Page: 426
  • Format: Paperback
  • Wendy Law Yone opens her first novel with the phrase of a survivor, Living things prefer to go on living A young woman and her older half brother are expelled from their home in Burma by a savage political coup Sent to elusive safety in America, the motherless siblings find themselves engulfed by the indifference, hypocrisy, and cruelty of an American society unable toWendy Law Yone opens her first novel with the phrase of a survivor, Living things prefer to go on living A young woman and her older half brother are expelled from their home in Burma by a savage political coup Sent to elusive safety in America, the motherless siblings find themselves engulfed by the indifference, hypocrisy, and cruelty of an American society unable to deal with difference Her brother s death drives the unnamed narrator into the seclusion of a mental hospital, where memories of her childhood and the strength it ingrained in her are enough to heal her heart and return her to the outside world.

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      Posted by:Wendy Law-Yone
      Published :2019-07-23T02:42:33+00:00

    About "Wendy Law-Yone"

    1. Wendy Law-Yone

      Wendy Law Yone born 1947 is a critically acclaimed Burmese American author of novels and short stories The daughter of notable Burmese newspaper publisher, editor and politician Edward Michael Law Yone, Law Yone was born in Mandalay but grew up in Rangoon Law Yone has indicated that her father s imprisonment under the military regime limited her options in the country She was barred from university, but not allowed to leave the country In 1967, an attempt to escape to Thailand failed and she was imprisoned, but managed to leave Burma as a stateless person She relocated to the United States in 1973, settling in Washington D.C after attending college in Florida In 1987, she was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Award for Creative Writing 8 In 2002, she received a David T.K Wong Creative Writing Fellowship from the University of East Anglia.Her novels, The Coffin Tree 1983 and Irrawaddy Tango 1993 , were critically well received, with the latter nominated in 1995 for the Irish Times Literary Prize Her third novel, The Road to Wanting, 2010 is set in Burma, China and Thailand and was long listed for the Orange Prize 2011.

    859 thoughts on “The Coffin Tree”

    1. I loved this book. It's very gritty yet surreal. The narrator really sucks you in and it's confusing and terrifying and beautiful all at once!


    2. It's unfair of me to have expectations of an author or the time that they're writing about - but I was really amped up for a story about the takeover of Burma and the events leading up to the storyline in her other novel "Irrawaddy Tango".I was okay with the turn of events that took place once she and her brother ended up in the US - but what happened in the last bit of the book? I really have no clue.


    3. I'm loving this book. I'm so glad that I gave it a second chance. Quite marvelous writing that pulled me right into the lives of narrator and everyone she is involved with. The author has a new book out. Just ordered it. Highly recommended.



    4. Written in beautiful prose, and many passages about death and suicide made me want to scream YES, but overall the book seemed to lack focus.



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