Granta 115: The F Word

Granta The F Word Women in the twenty first century still live in a world in which the balance of power remains tipped towards men This bold political issue of Granta will explore this dynamic from a wide variety of l

  • Title: Granta 115: The F Word
  • Author: John Freeman Julie Otsuka Taiye Selasi Linda Gregerson Lydia Davis Laura Bell Louise Erdrich Helen Simpson
  • ISBN: 9781905881345
  • Page: 191
  • Format: Paperback
  • Women in the twenty first century still live in a world in which the balance of power remains tipped towards men.This bold, political issue of Granta will explore this dynamic from a wide variety of literary genres and perspectives Rachel Cusk provides a startlingly honest account of a marriage, its breakdown, and the aftermath Caroline Moorehead gives voice to women whoWomen in the twenty first century still live in a world in which the balance of power remains tipped towards men.This bold, political issue of Granta will explore this dynamic from a wide variety of literary genres and perspectives Rachel Cusk provides a startlingly honest account of a marriage, its breakdown, and the aftermath Caroline Moorehead gives voice to women who took part in the French Resistance and were sent to Nazi death camps for their involvement Urvashi Butalia writes of a male to female transsexual in India, who discovers all the obstacles of her adopted sex A.S Byatt lays bare the sexism of 1960s academia And Francine Prose recalls her own personal journey toward feminism.The issue features new fiction from Edwidge Danticat, Julie Otsuka, Louise Erdrich and Jeanette Winterson In Night Thoughts , Helen Simpson hilariously sends up all the sacred pieties of the male provider The Sex Lives of African Girls , introduces an astonishing new voice, Taiye Selasi, who spins a haunting story about the way adult sexuality can be imposed upon the young.With award winning reportage, memoir and fiction, over the years Granta has illuminated the most complex issues of modern life through the refractory light of literature The F Word will continue this tradition by addressing a theme many readers know has never lost its urgency.

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      191 John Freeman Julie Otsuka Taiye Selasi Linda Gregerson Lydia Davis Laura Bell Louise Erdrich Helen Simpson
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      Posted by:John Freeman Julie Otsuka Taiye Selasi Linda Gregerson Lydia Davis Laura Bell Louise Erdrich Helen Simpson
      Published :2019-06-07T05:08:41+00:00

    About "John Freeman Julie Otsuka Taiye Selasi Linda Gregerson Lydia Davis Laura Bell Louise Erdrich Helen Simpson"

    1. John Freeman Julie Otsuka Taiye Selasi Linda Gregerson Lydia Davis Laura Bell Louise Erdrich Helen Simpson

      Note There is than one author in the database with this name.John Freeman is an award winning writer and book critic who has written for numerous publications, including The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, The Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, and The Wall Street Journal Freeman won the 2007 James Patterson Pageturner Award for his work as the president of the National Book Critics Circle, and was the editor of Granta from 2009 to 2013 He lives in New York City, where he teaches at NYU and edits a new literary biannual called Freeman s.

    199 thoughts on “Granta 115: The F Word”

    1. Granta can be a bit of a mixed bag, and sometimes it's rather like those slightly disappointing lucky dip bags where you ended up with a plastic whistle and a gobstopper, but this is one of the best. Maybe it's the subject matter: we may live in a post-feminist age, but there are still questions around the choices open to people according to their gender. I'd be hard-pressed to pick a favourite, especially with such amazing writers as A.S.Byatt, clear-eyed and ironic, or Louise Erdrich, mysterio [...]


    2. An issue of the most macho literary magazine ever, with exclusively female contributors! I had to read it. The title is stupid -- a man must have come up with it -- but the content belies it. I enjoyed most of the pieces -- much less pretentious and literary than the average Granta contribution (admittedly I haven't read many lately; I let my subscription lapse a few years ago and have'nt been tempted to renew it).I really liked Rachel Cusk's reflective and honest piece on the aftermath of a bre [...]


    3. I read most of the selections, skipped those by Linda Gregerson, Lydia Davis, Taiye Selasi, Edwidge Danticat,and Maja Hrgovic. In one way or another I found the selections I read worth reading.


    4. El mejor libro que leí en este año y probablemente en varios. The F word F is for fear F is for fuck F is for feminist.


    5. I agree with other reviewers that Granta, at least judging from this issue, can be really uneven. Some entries were really smart and interesting, whereas others were obviously filler.One of my biggest peeves about this issue is that it's not particularly thematically coherent. I understand that all of the authors in this issue are women. But there should have been more to it than that. Otherwise, it comes off as just the Token Issue Where We Pretend Publishing Is Not Completely Phallocentric. (Y [...]


    6. I read a short story in here entitled, "The Sex Lives of African Girls." I had to perform the literature for a speech & debate competition. I won a Bronze Medal at a National Competition for this piece. It's written entirely in second person, and it's about a young Ghanaian girl who is sent to live with her abusive Uncle in Lagos, Nigeria. It's kind of difficult to read because of the flashbacks, but I like the little girl's voice. The reason why her voice is so sophisticated is because she' [...]


    7. I don't like memoir. I don't like whiney memoirs. I don't like feminist whiney memoirs. This issue is simply too filled with memoir and my other least favorite genre poetry. Did I mention that I hate poetry? Ugh! Took all I had to finish this issue. I am thankful that occasionally the memoirs and poetry were interrupted by actual stories like The Children by Julie Otsuka, The Dreadful Mucamas by Lydia Davis, The Sex Lives of African Girls by Taiye Selasi (excellent) and All I Know About Gertrude [...]


    8. A fine anthology of memoir, fiction, photography and poetry. Writers from all over the world. Explores themes of surivival, love wearing coats of many colors, feminism, then and now, and so much else. Have subscribed to Granta for years and it's been a good investment. Especially liked AS Byatt's "No Grls Alod. Insept Mom" Jeanette Winterson's "All I Know About Gertrude Stein," Urvashi Butalia's "Mona's Story," and Taiye Selasi's "The Sex Lives of African Girls." If anyone wants to borrow this i [...]


    9. I loved this. Most times when I read a literary journal, I end up skipping through anywhere from a quarter to a third of the journal. This time I read the whole thing.Standouts for me were: "The Dreadful Mucamas" by Lydia Davis, "The Sex Lives of African Girls" by Taiye Selasi and "Zlatka" by Maja Hrgovic. I didn't much care for Rachel Cusk's "Aftermath," but I really enjoyed everything else.



    10. Fantastic collection of feminist writings. The magazine touches on nearly every aspect of feminism, both western and nonwestern. It's smart, accessible, and enlightening. I highly suggest it.



    11. Louise Erdich- The Obijwe Week; Maja Hrgovic-Zlatka; Night Thoughts-Helen Simpson; A stunning photo essay by Clarisse d'Arcimoles and a peice by Jeanette Winterson that I actually liked.






    12. Just read a great story in Granta, by Jeanette Winterson" called "all I know about Gertrude Stein." It made my day, such great writing:)



    13. Caroline Moorehead's "A Train In Winter" is simply stunning, makes me want to go and read the whole book. The rest of the stories are a bit hit and miss.


    14. More misses than hits, but I appreciate the world's most macho literary magazine trying to take a stab at feminist literature.




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